Native Child and Family Services of Toronto (NCFST)
   
The Native Child and Family Services of Toronto greenroof.  Notice the Algonkian style three-sisters garden is visible; Photo Courtesy of BioroofProject Name: Native Child and Family Services of Toronto (NCFST)
Year: 2010
Owner: Native Child and Family Services of Toronto
Location: Toronto, Canada
Building Type: Non-Profit
Type: Extensive
System: Single Source Provider
Size: 5716 sq.ft.
Slope: 1%
Access: Accessible, Private
Submitted by: Bioroof Systems

Designers/Manufacturers of Record:
Architect: Levitt Goodman Architects
Landscape Architect: Scott Torrance Landscape Architect Inc.
Green Roof System & Manufacturer: Bioroof Systems
General Contractor: Boszko and Verity
Green Roof Installation: Living Architectural Contracting Inc.
The Native Child and Family Services of Toronto greenroof.  See the fire circle and traditional native sweat lodge; Photo Courtesy of BioroofSee the fire circle and traditional native sweat lodge; Photo Courtesy of BioroofThe Native Child and Family Services of Toronto greenroof.  See the fire circle and traditional native sweat lodge; Photo Courtesy of Bioroof
"Native Child and Family Services of Toronto is housed in a 4-storey, 2,462 m2 building that contains office space and a service/community mall where NCFST provides services to clients, such as the Early Years Centre, Community Kitchen, Youth Program, and reception. The building was unoccupied and not maintained for a number of years before NCFST purchased it in 2007. Issues included roof leaks, mould and inoperable HVAC systems. As part of the renovations, which included installing a green roof, energy-efficient lighting was installed throughout the building.

"NCFST's first priority was to install a new roof membrane that would stop leaks and remain compatible for a future green roof. The green roof was started in 2009 and completed in 2010. NCFST decided to install a green roof, rather than a conventional roof, to facilitate traditional Aboriginal culture in their urban setting," (NCFST).

In 1986 Native Child and Family Services of Toronto started with 2 staff members, a budget of $80,000 and a vision of a single point of access to vital community services for Aboriginal peoples living in Toronto. The organization's founders were concerned by the high number of Aboriginal children in care of Children's Aid societies and saw the need for a community service that would be family and child focused, holistic, integrated, preventative, with a strong Native cultural base as a foundation. 26 years later NCFST has 180 staff, a budget of over $20 million and provides an array of services such as Canada's largest Aboriginal Head Start program, residential and day camps, children's mental health services, youth outreach services, residential care, and much more.

In 2010, NCFST celebrated the grand opening of its new home at 30 College Street. They wanted a home that would express the cultural vision of the organization, including a strong sense of environmental stewardship. A green roof seemed an obvious choice, but they wanted more than just a pretty roof garden - they wanted to make a statement about the organization and offer useable program space.
The Native Child and Family Services of Toronto greenroof.  See the fire circle and traditional native sweat lodge; Photo Courtesy of BioroofThe Native Child and Family Services of Toronto greenroof.  See the fire circle and traditional native sweat lodge; Photo Courtesy of Bioroof
In a green roof industry dominated by designs imported from Europe and components imported from the US, Bioroof systems stands out as a company whose experiences and manufacturing are firmly based in southern Ontario, right in the NCFST's "backyard." Bioroof was able to provide the materials and expertise to create a plant palette that would be instantly recognizable to the Haudenosaunee (a.k.a. Iroquois) who lived on the land that would become Toronto five centuries later.

The plant palette includes traditional Anishnaabe (a.k.a. Ojibway and Algonquin) medicines such as cedar, sweet grass and sage. At the core of the plantings is a garden of corn, beans and squash. In traditional Haudenosaunee farming practice, these three seeds were sown together in a mutually supporting relationship: the corn would support the bean stalks, the beans would act to fix nitrogen in the soil and fertilize the plants, while the wide and low leaves of the squash would keep weeds at bay and help trap moisture in the soil. So perfectly did these three plants synchronize that they were known in many Native North American languages as "The Three Sisters" and were a staple of diets in agrarian cultures all across pre-Columbian North America.

But the gardens are not just symbolic, they provide an opportunity for the city children and youth visiting the centre to learn firsthand about traditional horticulture and life ways. As well as an open air classroom, the roof is also a meeting place for the community. The accessible areas have been built with soft surface play areas, natural log seating and a fire pit. The heart of the roof is the Healing Lodge, a structure influenced by the traditional Anishnaabe Sweat Lodge.

In addition to providing the complete green roof system Bioroof was able to provide valuable advice and consultation. Working closely with Scott Torrance (landscape architect), Boszko and Verity (general contractors) and Living Architecture (system installers), Bioroof was an integral part of the plant palette discussion as well as advising on the materials needed to retrofit such an ambitious design onto an already existing office building.

Today, four stories above the streets of Canada's largest city, the Native Child and Family Services Centre's green roof is forging a living link with a country's history and a people's traditions.

Additional thumbnail photos:

The Native Child and Family Services of Toronto greenroof photo as it appears in the 2013 Greenroofs & Walls of the World? Calendar; Photos Courtesy BioroofThe Native Child and Family Services of Toronto greenroof.  See the fire circle and traditional native sweat lodge; Photo Courtesy of BioroofThe Native Child and Family Services of Toronto greenroof.  See the fire circle and traditional native sweat lodge; Photo Courtesy of BioroofThe Native Child and Family Services of Toronto greenroof.  See the fire circle and traditional native sweat lodge; Photo Courtesy of BioroofThe Native Child and Family Services of Toronto greenroof.  See the fire circle and traditional native sweat lodge; Photo Courtesy of Bioroof
The Native Child and Family Services of Toronto is located at 30 College Street, Toronto, ON, Canada; 416.969.8510 ext. 3133; Contact: Norman Clarke, Facilities Manager and visit their website. Download the Native Child and Family Services of Toronto Ecoroof Case Study.

The Native Child and Family Services of Toronto was featured in the month of April in the
2013 Greenroofs & Walls of the World(TM) Calendar.
 
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