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North America: (USA & Canada)

AIA (American Institute of Architects)
American Rivers
ASLA (American Society of Landscape Architects)

Athena Sustainable Materials Institute

Chicago Botanic Gardens
City of Atlanta

City of Austin

City of Baltimore
City of Chicago

City of Cincinnati

City of Houston

City of Lexington
City of Louisville
City of Milwaukee

City of New Orleans
City of New York

City of North Vancouver
City of Philadelphia

City of Pittsburgh
City of Portland, ME
City of Portland, OR
City of San Francisco
City of Seattle
City of Toronto
Denver Botanic Gardens
DC (District of Columbia)

 

EERE (Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy)

EPA (Environmental Protection Agency)

FedBizOpps.gov (Federal Business Opportunities)

General Services Administration (GSA)

Green Building Initiative (GBI) - Green Globes

Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI)

Green Infrastructure Ontario Coalition (GIO)
GRHC (Green Roofs for Healthy Cities)

Minnesota Green Roofs Council (MGRC)
NAHB (National Association of Home Builders)

NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration)

NRCA (National Roofing Contractors Association)
NRDC (Natural Resources Defense Council)
SERF (Society of Environmentally Responsible Facilities)
Smart Growth America
SPRI (Single Ply Roofing Industry)
State of Alaska

State of Illinois (EPA)

State of Massachusetts

State of New Jersey

State of Tennessee
TD Economics

USDA (Forest Service)

US Dept. of Energy (Energy.gov)
USGBC (United States Green Building Council)

   
International:

ASTM International

Australia

Bulgaria

EFB (European Federation of Green Roof Assoc.)

France

Global Industry Analysts

ICC (International Code Council)

IGRA (International Green Roof Association)
 

 

Israel

Korea

Mexico

RnRMarketResearch.com

Technavio

UK - GRO (The Green Roof Organisation)

Lux Research
WGIN (World Green Infrastructure Network)

Worldwide


North America:
 

AIA (American Institute of Architects)

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has selected the 2015 recipients of the Institute Honor Awards, the profession’s highest recognition of works that exemplify excellence in architecture, interior architecture and urban design. Selected from roughly 500 submissions, 23 recipients located throughout the world will be honored at the AIA 2015 National Convention and Design Exposition in Atlanta.

2015 Top Ten Award Winners with Green Roofs:

  • Cambridge Public Library; Cambridge, Massachusetts; William Rawn Associates, Architects, Inc.; Associate Architect: Ann Beha Architects
    The AIA called this project "the perfect marriage of old and new." The original 1889 Romanesque library building was "rigorously renovated and seamlessly connected" to a 76,000-square-foot glass building. 33,000 square feet of the newly landscaped city park surrounding the library is a green roof covering an underground parking garage. Jury comment: "The graceful, transparent addition respects and complements the 1888 building while offering great expanses of beautiful sunlit space with vistas of the surrounding park. Circulation is clear and inviting, and the challenging connection to the historic library is elegantly handled."
     

  • John Jay College of Criminal Justice; New York City; Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP
    The new John Jay College building provides "all the functions of a traditional college campus within the confines of a single city block," with a descending four-story "social cascade" of "staircases, escalators, and stepped amphitheater seating" topped by a 65,000-square-foot green roof that acts as a campus commons. Jury comment: "This massive programmatic space has created an entire village—from a beautiful and happy daycare to a full-service kitchen and dining facility, mock courtrooms, and full-science laboratories. The diversity of space is impressive, and it is hard to imagine that it could be done better."
     

  • Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology; Philadelphia, WEISS/MANFREDI
    Nanoscale research is at the core of cutting-edge breakthroughs that transcend the disciplinary boundaries of engineering, medicine, and the sciences. The center has two green roofs and a new 1.7-acre landscaped courtyard. The building orientation, along with the patterned acid-etched glass with ceramic frit, maximizes light and views into labs, offices, and public spaces. Combined with a low-E coating, this pattern helps reduce heat gain and glare. Super-insulated pleated metal panels shield light-sensitive labs on the perimeter of the site and minimize heat gain. The building is certified LEED Gold®.
     

  • LeFrak Center at Lakeside Prospect Park; New York City, Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects
    This project restored 26 acres of Brooklyn’s Prospect Park, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux in the 19th century, and added a new 75,000-square foot, year-round skating and recreational facility. Clad in rough-hewn gray granite, the new LeFrak Center appears to be large stone retaining walls set in the landscape. Much of the structure is tucked into the land. The L-shaped plan consists of the east and north block, both one-story structures with roof terraces connected by a bridge. [1.9.15]

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) and its Committee on the Environment (COTE) have selected the top ten examples of sustainable architecture and ecological design projects that protect and enhance the environment. The projects will be honored at the AIA 2014 National Convention and Design Exposition in Chicago. The COTE Top Ten Awards program, now in its 18th year, is the profession's best known recognition program for sustainable design excellence. The program celebrates projects that are the result of a thoroughly integrated approach to architecture, natural systems and technology. They make a positive contribution to their communities, improve comfort for building occupants and reduce environmental impacts through strategies such as reuse of existing structures, connection to transit systems, low-impact and regenerative site development, energy and water conservation, use of sustainable or renewable construction materials, and design that improves indoor air quality.

2014 Top Ten Award Winners with Green Roofs:

  • Bushwick Inlet Park; Brooklyn, New York; Kiss + Cathcart, Architects
    This project is the first phase of the transformation of the Greenpoint–Williamsburg waterfront from a decaying industrial strip to a multifaceted public park. The design team integrated a program of playfields, public meeting rooms, classrooms, and park maintenance facilities, into a city-block sized site. The park building becomes a green hill on the west side, making 100% of the site usable to the public, and offering views to Manhattan. Below the green roof is a complex of building systems – ground source heat pump wells, rainwater harvest and storage, and drip irrigation. A solar trellis produces half the total energy used in the building.
     

  • Gateway Center - SUNY-ESF College of Environmental Science & Forestry, Syracuse, NY; Architerra
    The SUNY-ESF College of Environmental Science & Forestry Gateway Center is a striking symbol of environmental stewardship and climate action leadership. This LEED Platinum campus center meets ESF’s goal of reducing the overall carbon footprint of the campus through net positive renewable energy production, while creating a combined heat and power plant and intensive green roof that serve as hands-on teaching and research tools. The double-ended bioclimatic form exemplifies passive solar design. Net positive energy systems integrated with the design serve four adjacent ESF buildings, providing 60% of annual campus heating needs and 20% of annual power needs. [4.23.14]

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has selected ten recipients for the 2014 Housing Awards. The AIA’s Housing Awards program, now in its 14th year, was established to recognize the best in housing design and promote the importance of good housing as a necessity of life, a sanctuary for the human spirit and a valuable national resource. The jury recognized projects in four award categories: One/Two Family Custom Housing, One/Two Family Production Housing (none selected this year), Multifamily Housing and Special Housing. You can learn more about these projects by clicking on the name of the project/firm name. 2014 AIA Housing Award Winner with a Green Roof: The Informal House in South Pasadena, CA, by Koning Eizenberg Architecture, Inc. and the Cherokee Studios in Los Angeles, by Brooks + Scarpa. [4.7.14]

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) announces the 2014 Honor Awards: Architecture for North America.  The AIA named the 2014 Honor Awards, selecting 26 projects from over 700 submissions. Eleven of the winning projects were granted to architecture projects, ranging from a single-family home to a library and airport. The Institute Honor Awards program recognizes achievements for a broad range of architectural activity to elevate the general quality of architecture practice, establish a standard of excellence against which all architects can measure performance, and inform the public of the breadth and value of architecture practice. View all 2014 AIA Awards Recipients and watch this video from CNN on YouTube. [1.10.14]



American Rivers

Without proper maintenance, any type of infrastructure can lose functionality and ultimately fail. As more communities move towards adopting green infrastructure as a cost-effective approach to manage polluted runoff, it is critical that local governments address barriers to operations and maintenance. Despite the benefits of green infrastructure, operations and maintenance has been repeatedly raised as a technical barrier to adoption of green infrastructure and remains a concern for many local governments in the Chesapeake Bay region and across the country. American Rivers and Green for All collaborated to develop two companion reports exploring different elements of operations and maintenance of green infrastructure in the region.

American Rivers Releases Guide To Integrate Green Infrastructure Into Stormwater Permits. This guide is intended to be a resource for community and watershed advocates that provides clear examples of new developments in municipal stormwater permits that foster on-site management of stormwater by encouraging or requiring that runoff be controlled through the practices commonly referred to as “low impact development” or “green infrastructure.” These permits represent an emerging new generation of regulatory approaches and reflect the emerging expertise of water advocacy organizations, stormwater professionals and permitting agencies. Our goal is to provide up-to-date information about new trends in stormwater permitting and examples of permits that demonstrate leadership toward standards that will build green infrastructure and compliance with water quality standards. With this tool, we hope to inform and inspire continued progress toward stormwater permitting and management that protects our rivers and other shared waters, invigorates healthy communities, and provides cost-effective solutions for stormwater managers. You may download Permitting Green Infrastructure: A Guide to Improving Municipal Stormwater Permits and Protecting Water Quality. [1.17.13]  



ASLA (
American Society of Landscape Architects)

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) has launched a new guide to explain the many benefits of “green infrastructure” — designed systems that harness nature to create proven benefits for communities and the environment. Green infrastructure includes park systems, urban forests, wildlife habitat and corridors, and green roofs and green walls. These infrastructure systems protect communities against flooding or excessive heat, or help to improve air and water quality, which underpin human and environmental health. [9.3.14]

The outlook remains positive for landscape architecture firms, according to the American Society of Landscape Architectssecond quarter 2014 Business Quarterly survey. The survey revealed a marked rise in billable hours and inquiries for new work. Hiring plans rose slightly from the last quarter. The survey indicates widespread strengthening of the landscape architecture industry, says Nancy Somerville, Hon. ASLA, executive vice president and CEO of ASLA. We are very much encouraged by the growth shown during the second quarter and rise in hiring plans, particularly among mid-sized firms. Hopefully, these signs point to continued growth for the rest of this year. The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) Business Quarterly survey asks quarterly benchmarks on key statistics including billable hours, inquiries, and hiring plans. The survey is not intended to be statistically significant but instead provides a snapshot of the landscape architecture industry. [8.12.14]

ASLA launches new educational resources for K-12 Teachers and Educators. The American Society of Landscape Architects is launching two new educational resources that will help young people and teachers explore the landscape architecture profession-a newly redesigned Career Discovery website and the new Tools for Teachers. The launch is part of ASLA's outreach for National Landscape Architecture Month in April. Tools for Teachers is a new education hub for K-12 teachers. It is loaded with fun, free classroom activities that will inspire lesson plans and start classroom dialogues about landscape architecture. It includes links to all of ASLA's educational resources, including: Hands-on classroom activities aligned to national teaching standards, The Roof is Growing! green roof education program, Designing Our Future: Sustainable Landscapes pages offering educational animations, case studies and K-12 classroom activities, and a link to a reservation form to visit the green roof on ASLA's Washington, D.C. headquarters. [4.8.14]  



Athena Sustainable Materials Institute

Athena Sustainable Materials Institute Releases New Version of its Acclaimed Life Cycle Assessment Software. New options, including Green Roofs and LEED-specific reporting, are available in Version 5 of the free software tool that is key to earning the LCA credits in North American green building programs. The Athena Sustainable Materials Institute today released Version 5 of the Impact Estimator for Buildings, its acclaimed life cycle assessment (LCA) software package for North American building designers. The Impact Estimator is a free and compliant whole building LCA software for architects and designers seeking the Whole Building LCA credits in LEED®v4, Green Globes®, the International Green Construction Code (IgCC), and the California Green Building Standard Code (CALGreen). [6.30.14]

 


 

Chicago Botanic Garden


Chicago Botanic Garden Concludes Largest Green Roof Plant Study in the United States. The Chicago Botanic Garden has released the results of the largest green roof plant study ever conducted in the U.S. Five years of research on the green roof of the Garden's Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Plant Conservation Science Center has led to the publication of Plant Evaluation Notes highlighting the most extensive list of best plants for green roofs in Zone 5. The Plant Conservation Science Center is a 38,000-square-foot, LEED gold-rated research laboratory with two 8,000-square-foot gardens on the north and south sides of the building's central clerestory. The Ellis Goodman Family Foundation Green Roof Garden South features regional and national native plants, many of which are not currently used as rooftop plants, while the Josephine P. & John J. Louis Foundation Green Roof Garden North features a mix of plants known as good green roof plants, plus native and exotic plants that have potential for green roof use.  [7.21.15] 

 



City of Atlanta

The Atlanta City Council has approved significant changes to the "post-construction stormwater ordinance" that will require the use of green stormwater infrastructure to manage stormwater onsite. Going forward, new and re-development sites greater than 500 square feet are required to treat the first inch of stormwater runoff with green infrastructure best management practices including rain gardens, bioswales, permeable paving, green roofs, etc. The ordinance also requires that new homes and large additions of 1000 square feet or more manage the first inch of stormwater runoff with green infrastructure best management practices. This is a huge step forward and puts Atlanta among progressive cities beginning to manage their water with natural infrastructure. [3.4.13] 



City of Austin

On August 27, 2009, Austin City Council charged the Green Roof Advisory Group (GRAG) to work with City staff to explore the feasibility of offering energy and stormwater credits and other incentives, based on performance, to encourage the creation of green roofs in the City. GRAG produced a policy document that included recommendations regarding those credits and incentives that would be appropriate for promoting green roofs in Austin. The stakeholder group was drawn from the fields of design, development, and green building and includes input from local green roof organizations and the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. GRAG's findings were presented to various City of Austin Boards and Commissions throughout September and October, and the final report to City Council will be on October 28, 2010. Please see the final GRAG Report. [10.28.10]



City of Baltimore

Baltimore City Proposes to Adopt the International Green Construction Code (IgCC) in 2015 to replace the Baltimore City Green Building Standards. Since July of 2009, new buildings over 10,000 square feet built in Baltimore City have been required to meet the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standard at a Silver level. LEED is an evaluation system that rates the overall “greenness” of a building by assessing its energy and water efficiencies as well as certain site and interior design strategies. In 2010, the City offered an alternative compliance path by issuing the Baltimore City Green Building Standards, a locally developed alternative to LEED. [11.25.14]  



City of Chicago

The Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRD) announced that it has officially completed the construction of a green roof at its Racine Avenue Pumping Station (RAPS). RAPS is a building that houses main sewage pumps, which transport wastewater to the Stickney Water Reclamation Plant. The coarse screen building extension houses a conveyor system that removes trash from wastewater, which helps prevent damaging water treatment pumps. The structure's total building roof area is 33,000 square feet, with approximately 4,500 square feet being structurally rated to handle the additional vegetative roof loading. Originally constructed in 1939, the most recent roof replacement was performed in 1996 with a 10-year warranty. The 19-year-old tar roof showed its age; numerous leaks and worn-out repairs required replacement. However, instead of replacing the roof with heavy, impermeable tar, the new roof is a combination of asphalt and planting. [1.29.15]



City of Cincinnati

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Metropolitan Sewer District of Greater Cincinnati and the Cincinnati Office of Environmental Quality have created the first Green Roof Loan Program of its kind in Ohio. The Ohio EPA has made $5,000,000 available for linked-deposit, below-market-rate loans to install green vegetative roofs within the service area of MSD. These can be installed on residential, commercial and/or industrial buildings. Green roofs have wonderful benefits and have been utilized in Europe for many years to address various climate and aesthetic issues. They absorb rain water, help purify the air and provide additional green space in highly developed areas, especially within urban cores. [12.6.12] 



City of Houston

The Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC)/GeoTechnology Research Institute (GTRI) has partnered with the City of Houston to complete the City of Houston Feasibility Study for Rooftop Food Production and invites the submittal of a statement of qualifications (“Statement”) from interested firms and/or partnerships interested in investigating the design and economic feasibility, at a conceptual level, for urban rooftop food production on downtown municipal properties in the City of Houston. Download the RFQ document for more information. Statements are due by March 11, 2013. [1.24.13]



City of Lexington

Lexington residents seeking an opportunity to help improve the city’s environment are invited to apply for a 2013 Sustainability Grant. Lexington’s Department of Environmental Quality and Public Works is providing the grants, used by residents to work collaboratively and creatively to improve the environmental health of Lexington. Grants are available for a wide range of projects including rain gardens, green roofs, community gardens, streamside restoration, recycling programs, beautification projects (outside only), rain barrel projects, the cleanup and restoration of illegal dumpsites, litter projects, planting street trees and other projects that are determined to improve the environmental health of the community and meet the principles of sustainability. Applications must be postmarked or submitted to the department’s office by March 22, 2012. [1.28.13]  



City of Louisville

Mayor Seeks Citizen Input on Sustain Louisville Plan for Greener City. Establish a citywide alternative energy strategy. Increase TARC ridership by 25 percent. Develop a citywide green infrastructure program to reduce storm water runoff (implementing a Cool Green Roof program). Improve the energy efficiency of city-owned buildings by 20 percent. Those are some of the 60 initiatives contained in the city’s first comprehensive plan to make Louisville greener and more environmentally friendly. Mayor Greg Fischer today released the draft report of the plan, called Sustain Louisville, and is asking citizens to spend the month of February reading it and providing feedback. That input will be considered before the final report is released in March. [1.31.13]  



City of Milwaukee

MMSD has proposed awarding the 21 public and private property owners a total of $1.35 million in grants to help pay up to 50% of the cost of each project. The district's goal is to encourage property owners throughout the metropolitan area to build 740 million gallons' worth of storage capacity by 2035. The volume is 42% more than the deep tunnel system storage capacity of 521 million gallons. The program is known as Fresh Coast 740, and the district estimates it will distribute $1.3 billion over the next 20 years in grants to its green infrastructure partners. Storm water flowing off parking lots would enter a long swale connected to a rain garden. The system will prevent the water from draining to a combined sanitary and storm sewer there, and reduce pollutants in storm water draining to the canal, a tributary of the Menomonee River. For MMSD, the year 2035 also is the deadline the district has given itself to achieve no sewer overflows. Since 1994, the first full year of deep tunnel system operation, the district has had an average of 2.4 overflows a year of combined sanitary and storm sewers in central Milwaukee and eastern Shorewood. [6.16.14]

Milwaukee Receives EPA Great Lakes Shoreline Cities Green Infrastructure Grant. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced the award of a $1 million Great Lakes Restoration Initiative grant to the city of Milwaukee to fund green infrastructure projects to improve water quality in Lake Michigan. EPA Region 5 Administrator / Great Lakes National Program Manager Susan Hedman was joined at the Global Water Center by Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett to announce the grant. [3.12.14]



City of New Orleans

The Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans Announces Launch Of A New Green Infrastructure Program. The Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans is getting a little greener. The Board unveiled seven green infrastructure projects it’s partnering on that aim to improve community outreach and participation in the city’s water management. One of the seven grantees for the Sewerage and Water Board’s green initiative is Rabouin International High School. It plans to build both a blue and a green roof on top of its building in the CBD. Anthony Mayer is the project coordinator. Mayer says blue roof technology means creating a kind of bathtub on top of a building to catch excess rain and storm-water. Unlike most roofs, which let water run straight down, this roof keeps water up high, so it won’t back up sewers and cause floods. [9.26.14]  



City of New York

New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Commissioner Emily Lloyd today announced that six community-based stormwater management projects have been chosen to receive more than $3 million in funding through the Green Infrastructure Grant program, which will be augmented by nearly $1 million in matching funds from the recipients. Once completed, the six projects selected for funding today will prevent more than 6 million gallons of stormwater from entering the combined sewer system each year, thereby helping to reduce sewer overflows into local waterways. The grant program will help meet the goals of the New York City Green Infrastructure Plan, which aims to capture the first inch of rain that falls on 10 percent of the city’s impervious surfaces in combined sewer areas through a combination of City-built projects in streets and sidewalks, regulations for new development and redevelopment, and retrofits of existing development, including through the grant program. A new round of grant funding will be made available in 2015 for private property owners throughout the city, including commercial buildings, private schools and hospitals, and community and faith-based organizations. [2.12.15]

The goal of the Green Infrastructure Grant Program is to support projects that will reduce the strain of rainwater on the city’s combined sewer system by turning hard surfaces such as concrete into permeable ones such as the soil on green roofs. Applications must be submitted by Nov. 23. New York City is a world leader in protecting the natural environment and fighting climate change and we encourage community groups and non-profits from across the city to apply for the $5 million in new funding we have made available to build green infrastructure projects, DEP Commissioner Emily Lloyd said in a statement. [10.2.14]

The New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) today encouraged community groups, non-profits, and property owners to apply for the $6 million in new funding that is available for green projects through the 2014 Green Infrastructure Grant Program. DEP is engaged in a city-wide effort to soften the impervious urban landscape and help absorb rainwater that would otherwise drain into the combined sewer system and contribute to combined sewer overflows into local waterways. Notable projects that were funded during the first three years of the Grant Program and have completed construction include a 43,400 square foot green roof at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, one of the nation’s first blue/green roof combinations at The Osborne Association in the Bronx, a green roof at Lenox Hill Neighborhood House in Manhattan, permeable pavers and rain gardens at Queens College, a New York Restoration Project community garden in Brooklyn’s Gowanus neighborhood, and a green roof at Bishop Loughlin Memorial High School in Brooklyn. [3.4.14]



City of North Vancouver

The City of North Vancouver has introduced new incentives and requirements for all new construction. In addition, amendments to the City's Zoning Bylaw will provide more opportunities to include higher energy efficiency, waste and water diversion, local food production and healthy living environments into construction design. A summary of the zoning amendments, which was presented at a public meeting on October 20, 2014, included the following changes: Solar roofs, green roofs: Solar collector height exemption (four feet for ground-oriented residential and six feet for all other zones) and green roof exemption (1.5 ft for ground-oriented residential and up to 3.5 ft for all other zones). [11.10.14]  



City of Philadelphia

New Philly App Turns Saving Water Into Addictive Game. Paint on a green roof here. Add a rain garden there. Water-saving techniques have been around for years, but it can be tough to show how such building modifications can pay off for owners. That’s why, last month, the Philadelphia Water Department released Credits Explorer, an app that invites users to add — virtually — green stormwater infrastructure to their properties. In addition to green roofs and rain gardens, users can experiment with permeable pavement, underground basins, and other tools made of plants, soil, and stone that absorb stormwater instead of letting it run off into the quickly overworked sewer system. Credits Explorer then calculates how much property owners will save on their monthly Stormwater Management Service charge, a utility fee applied to all non-residential properties in Philadelphia to recover the cost of stormwater management. [6.15.15]

Blondell Reynolds-Brown wants to double the Green Roof Tax Credit. Reynolds-Brown introduced a bill that would double the value of the credit. Under the bill, applicants could receive a credit against their Business Income and Receipts Tax (BIRT) for half the cost of constructing the green roof. Currently, the credit covers 25 percent of the cost. So if you spend $10,000 to install a green roof above your business, you can currently reduce your business-tax liability by $2,500. The bill would raise that amount to $5,000. “Green roofs bring a sizable value to the property owner and the city,” Reynolds-Brown said in a press release. “They control stormwater, help curtail flooding, grow fresh fruits and vegetables, pump clean air back into the atmosphere and save property owners money by extending the life of the roof. They also contribute to the Mayor’s big picture goal of making Philadelphia the Greenest City in America.” [2.5.15]

PWD and PIDC Award $3.5 Million in Grants to Promote Green Stormwater Management Practices on Private Properties, Resulting in the Planned Development of 58 Green Acres. The Philadelphia Water Department (PWD) and the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation (PIDC) have awarded $3.5 million in grants to promote green stormwater management practices in a highly competitive selection process. These practices include rain gardens, vegetated infiltration basins, porous asphalt, and green roofs. [12.22.14]



City of Pittsburgh

The Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority (PWSA) awarded $250,000 in grant money to 17 projects through its inaugural Green Infrastructure Grant Program, following a competitive application process. The program supports community organizations and property owners demonstrating the management of stormwater with green infrastructure (GI). Seven matching grants ranging from $8,000 to $40,000 were awarded to property owners for larger-scale GI projects that will manage significant amounts of stormwater on their properties. Ten mini-grants of up to $5,000 were awarded to community and nonprofit organizations for projects that will increase awareness of the benefits of GI in Pittsburgh. The program received an impressive response with 38 total applications requesting over $600,000 in funding. Including the matching funds, this program will provide over $1 million towards GI projects in the City of Pittsburgh and a total estimated stormwater flow reduction of 3.5 to 4 million gallons annually. [8.12.15] 



City of Portland, ME

The City of Portland, ME, will release new details this week of a plan to charge property owners a stormwater fee for the amount of pavement, roof coverage and other hard surfaces on their land. Both homeowners and business owners will pay, although businesses with large parking lots and building footprints -- and that shed more rainwater -- will get hit harder than other landowners. The details include a preliminary estimate of the future stormwater rate, which will raise money for costly projects to keep dirty storm runoff out of waterways. The fee structure and timeline for rolling it out are still being discussed by the City Council's Finance Committee, and the actual rates ultimately must be set by the full City Council. The fee was intended to kick in this winter, but the launch is now expected to be pushed back. The fee can be reduced for properties whose owners install rain barrels, rain gardens, green roofs and commercial treatment centers. See the City of Portland, Maine's Proposed Stormwater Service Charge FAQs. [9.23.13] 



City of Portland, OR

International recognition for Portland’s Ecoroof Program. Portland’s reputation as a leader in ecoroof technology continues to grow. The city has received a 2013 Green Roof Leadership Award for Municipalities from the International Green Roof Association (IGRA). Portland received the award at the 3rd International Green Roof Congress held in May in Hamburg, Germany. Over 250 participants from more than 40 countries attended to learn about future trends for roof and façade greening. “It’s great for the city that Portland is receiving international recognition for our innovative stormwater management,” said City Commissioner Nick Fish. “Ecoroofs have many benefits, and one of the main benefits is that they make the sewer system more efficient and reliable by acting like giant sponges soaking up rain and keeping stormwater runoff out of our sewers.” The association noted that Portland’s work to promote green roofs is encouraging other cities around the world to adopt the technology to manage stormwater. “We’re honored to receive this award,” said Bureau of Environmental Services Director Dean Marriott. “And we are pleased that our efforts to promote green roofs are being recognized.” Green roofs replace conventional roofing materials with soil and vegetation. They manage stormwater onsite and provide many other human health and environmental benefits. Over 500 green roofs cover more than 1.5 million square feet of rooftop in the City of Portland. [6.11.13]



City of San Francisco

The City of San Francisco’s Green Building Ordinance (GBO) and related policies was named the winner of the World Green Building Council’s Best Green Building Policy Award. A joint venture led by URS Corporation provided significant guidance during the ordinance’s preparation by the San Francisco Department of the Environment. Evidence of the city’s commitment to green building includes the URS joint venture’s design and implementation of the city’s newest “living roof” at One South Van Ness Ave. The 10,000 square foot living roof adds insulation to the building, reduces stormwater runoff and features native plants that provide habitat for hummingbirds and butterflies. The project team also participated in San Francisco’s JobsNow training program by instructing interns on plant identification, irrigation control and weeding techniques. [12.19.11]



City of Seattle

Seattle releases strategy to reduce stormwater pollution with green approaches. The City of Seattle recently released a DRAFT GSI implementation strategy to guide our work in managing polluted stormwater runoff with green approaches. In 2013, Seattle City Council Resolution 31459 challenged Seattle to rely on GSI to manage stormwater runoff wherever possible and set an aggressive target to manage 700 million gallons of stormwater runoff annually with GSI by the year 2025-a seven fold increase over Seattle's 2012 baseline. The draft Strategy sets an interim goal of managing 400 million gallons of stormwater runoff annually with GSI by the year 2020, summarizes progress to date, outlines a set of strategies and planned investments for accelerating the adoption of GSI in Seattle, and articulates a two-year work plan for City of Seattle departments. OSE is accepting public comment on the Strategy until August 26. [7.30.15]



City of Toronto

The City of Toronto has expanded their Eco Roof Incentive Program by adding the eligibility of residential roofs and increasing the incentive amount for the green roof grant to $75 per square metre. Introduced in 2009, the initiative aims to reduce energy consumption and emissions. One of the updates to the program increases the green roof grant to $75 per square metre to maximum of $100,000. The amount for cool roof grants remains the same at two dollars per square metre to coat over an existing roof and five dollars per square metre to cover a new roof. The grant has a $50,000 maximum. [8.21.13]



Denver Botanic Gardens

Green inside and out, the Gardens is considered one of the top botanical gardens in the United States and a pioneer in water conservation. Accredited by the American Association of Museums, the Gardens’ living collections encompass specimens from the tropics to the tundra, showcasing a plant palette chosen to thrive in Colorado’s semi-arid climate. The Gardens' dynamic, 23-acre urban oasis in the heart of the city is now in its 52nd year, offering unforgettable opportunities to flourish with unique garden experiences for the whole family – as well as world-class education and plant conservation research programs. Additional sites at Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield, a 750-acre wildlife and native plant refuge in Jefferson County; and Mount Goliath, a high-altitude trail and interpretive site on the Mount Evans Scenic Byway, extend this experience throughout the Front Range. For more information, visit us online at www.botanicgardens.org.



DC (District of Columbia)

The Washington, DC Metropolitan Region has been recognized for the second year in a row as number one in North America for green roof installations. In its 2014 Annual Green Roof Industry Survey, Green Roofs for Healthy Cities (GRHC) reports that the DC area installed over 1.2 million square feet of green roofs (or vegetated roofs) in 2014. The metropolitan region of Toronto, Ontario ranked number two, with 775,216 square feet installed, followed by Philadelphia and Chicago. [5.8.15]

The Smart Roof Project, funded by the District of Columbia Department of General Services (DGS), addresses a large opportunity for Washington, DC to achieve its aspirations to become the greenest, healthiest, most equitable city in the US: how it uses the roofs of city owned buildings. The last decade has seen the emergence of a range of rooftop technologies that provide important health, energy, water, and environmental benefits. These technologies include: cool roofs; green roofs; and rooftop PV. Impacts from the deployment of these technologies on District owned buildings, regions of a city, or city-wide could be transformative for quality of life, sharply cut energy bills, improve the quality of local waterbodies, and help slow climate change cost-effectively. The Smart Roof Cost-Benefit Summary and the Report demonstrates that, in general, cool roofs, green roofs, and rooftop solar PV are cost-effective retrofit options and that these technologies bring both substantial benefits to building owners as well as broader benefits to the community. Based on these findings, virtually all DGS roofs should have one or several of these technologies. [4.16.15]



EERE (Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy)

The FEMP (Federal Energy Management Program) Technology Deployment Program focuses on market-driven technologies and creating market pull for new and underutilized technologies within the Federal sector. The information within this section help Federal agencies identify and assess new and underutilized technologies for deployment. The New and Underutilized Technology: Green Roofs webpage has been updated to include the following information which outlines key deployment considerations for green roofs within the Federal sector. This information spans: Benefits, Application, Climate and Regional Considerations, Key Factors for Deployment, Ranking Criteria, and Resources. [8.18.11]  



EPA (Environmental Protection Agency)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced a poster contest to highlight green infrastructure and low-impact development projects in Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Texas. Did your business build a parking garage with a green roof? Do your city government buildings harvest rainwater? EPA wants to hear about projects like these in preparation for the EPA Region 6 Stormwater Conference. [8.13.15]

As part of President Obama’s Climate Action Plan Virtual Climate Resilience Toolkit, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the release of the Climate Adjustment Tool for EPA’s Stormwater Management Model – a widely-used, downloadable online stormwater simulation model. The Climate Adjustment Tool allows engineers and planners to evaluate the performance of water infrastructure while considering future climate change projections, such as more frequent high-intensity storms and changes in evaporation rates of seasonal precipitation, to determine the benefits of resiliency decisions to reduce local economic burden and protect communities. [2.13.15]

On June 26, 2014, EPA’s Heat Island Reduction Program hosted a webcast entitled Keeping Your Cool: How Communities Across the Country are Reducing the Heat Island Effect. The webcast provided an overview of the heat island effect, its impacts, and the strategies that communities can take to reduce urban temperatures, and showcased the actions that the cities of Los Angeles, Louisville, and Tucson are taking now to reduce their heat islands. The presentation files, audio recordings, and transcripts are now available. The recordings and transcripts also include all questions posed to the speakers during and after the webcast, along with their answers. [7.30.14]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is launching its third-annual Campus RainWorks Challenge, a prize contest that engages college students in developing innovative green infrastructure systems to reduce stormwater pollution and build resilience to climate change. Through Campus RainWorks, teams of undergraduate and graduate students, working with a faculty advisor, develop a proposed green infrastructure project for the campus, showing how managing stormwater at its source can benefit the community and the environment. [7.24.14]

Watch EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program webcast: "Keeping Your Cool - How Communities Across the Country are Reducing the Heat Island Effect". The term "heat island" refers to built-up areas that are hotter than nearby rural areas. The heat island effect can negatively affect communities by increasing summertime peak energy demand, air conditioning costs, air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, heat-related illness and mortality, and water quality. As the 2014 summer heats up, learn how communities are taking a number of common-sense steps to reduce the effects of summertime heat islands. This webcast, featuring presentations and case studies from U.S. EPA and local governments, will give participants a better understanding of the heat island effect, its impacts, and the strategies that communities can take to reduce urban temperatures. It will feature case studies from across the country, showcasing the actions that communities are taking now to reduce the heat island effect, including cool roof ordinances, tree-planting campaigns, and heat management planning. [6.26.14]

EPA Awards $860,000 to Communities to Reduce Water Pollution, Build Resilience to Climate Change; Albuquerque mixed-use development will get help designing green infrastructure. This week the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the Albuquerque flood control authority is one of 14 recipients nationwide of part of $860,000 to expand the use of green infrastructure to reduce water pollution and boost resilience to the impacts of climate change. The funding is in support of President Obama’s Climate Action Plan, which directs federal agencies to identify climate-resilient investments such as agency grants and technical assistance for communities across the country. [5.1.14]

Milwaukee Receives EPA Great Lakes Shoreline Cities Green Infrastructure Grant. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced the award of a $1 million Great Lakes Restoration Initiative grant to the city of Milwaukee to fund green infrastructure projects to improve water quality in Lake Michigan. EPA Region 5 Administrator / Great Lakes National Program Manager Susan Hedman was joined at the Global Water Center by Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett to announce the grant. [3.12.14]

EPA Releases Planning Resource to Help Communities Manage Stormwater and Wastewater with Green Infrastructure. EPA has released “Greening CSO Plans: Planning and Modeling Green Infrastructure for Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) Control,” to provide municipalities and sewer authorities with tools to help quantify green infrastructure contributions to CSO control plans. Communities with combined sewers often view green infrastructure as an attractive way to reduce stormwater flows going into their sewer system, thus helping to reduce capital and operational costs at publicly owned treatment works. Greening CSO Plans will help communities make cost-effective decisions to maximize water quality benefits. The resource explains how to use modeling tools such as EPA’s Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) to optimize different combinations of gray and green infrastructure to reduce both sewer overflow volume and number of overflow events. [3.7.14]

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced nearly $5 million dollars in grants to five universities to evaluate innovative green infrastructure practices in urban areas, using Philadelphia, Pa. as the pilot area. These grants stem from a cooperative partnership between EPA and Philadelphia’s Green City, Clean Waters program that represents a broad, long-term investment in implementing green infrastructure stormwater management practices. Philadelphia is a national leader among cities around the country in using green infrastructure to address problems from combined sewer overflows (CSOs). Green infrastructure is a cost-effective and innovative approach to reduce runoff from overflowing combined sewer systems in urban areas. The goal of green infrastructure is to retain or redirect water into the ground where plants and soil will naturally filter the water – avoiding CSOs and reducing violations of the Clean Water Act. Green infrastructure investments also make our communities cleaner, healthier, and more attractive places to live and work. [1.21.14]



FedBizOpps.gov (Federal Business Opportunities)

The American Federal Government spends about $500 billion per year on services and products and about almost half of it is allocated to use services and buying products from small businesses in America. If you have business company, you might be asking yourself if the American Fed Gov wants your products or services. Yes they do, The US Government buy anything from cloths and uniform to satellite systems and aerospace components. You will find more than thirteen million services and products bought by the Federal government every year. There are more than 1000 government agencies that buy products plus all type of services intended to maintain the nation working and running smoothly, but just about a quarter of all US businesses that are registered and authorized for doing business with the US government. There aren’t any charges to register or join up and the procedure to be part of it is pretty simple. You can search for opportunities to install and maintain "green roofs" here. [3.15.12]



General Services Administration (GSA)

U.S. General Services Administration (GSA), which currently maintains over 2 million square feet of green roofs, has a long history of constructing and maintaining successful green roofs, dating back to 1935. The GSA Green Roof Report: The Benefits and Challenges of Green Roofs on Public and Commercial Buildings, was commissioned by the Office of Federal High Performance Green Buildings and includes a literature review of 200 research studies, in-depth analysis of green roof benefits, an original cost-benefit analysis, discussion of challenges and best practices, and assessment of further research needs. [6.21.14] 



Green Building Initiative (GBI)

The Green Building Initiative (GBI) is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to accelerate the adoption of building practices that result in energy-efficient, healthier and environmentally sustainable buildings by promoting credible and practical green building approaches for residential and commercial construction. GBI offers Green Globes® environmental assessment and certification programs for commercial buildings. Green Globes is a web-based program for green building guidance and certification that includes an onsite assessment by a third party. Backed by excellent customer support, Green Globes offers a streamlined and affordable alternative to LEED as a way to advance the overall environmental performance and sustainability of commercial buildings. The program has modules supporting new construction - Green Globes for New Construction (NC), existing buildings – Green Globes for Continual Improvement of Existing Buildings (CIEB), and Healthcare buildings – Green Globes CIEB for Healthcare. It is suitable for a wide range of buildings from large and small offices, multi-family structures, hospitals, and institutional buildings such as courthouses, schools, and universities.
 



Green Business Certification Inc. (GBCI)


GBCI Launches SITES, its Newly Acquired Rating System for Sustainable Landscapes. SITES was developed through a collaborative, interdisciplinary effort of the American Society of Landscape Architects, The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at The University of Texas at Austin, and the United States Botanic Garden. The rating system can be applied to development projects located on sites with or without buildings - ranging from national parks to corporate campuses, streetscapes and homes, and much more. [6.10.15]

The most comprehensive system for developing sustainable landscapes, the SITES v2 Rating System, has been released by the Sustainable Sites Initiative™ (SITES™) program for use by landscape architects, designers, engineers, architects, developers, policymakers and others who work in land design and development. The SITES v2 Rating System and an accompanying Reference Guide provide a set of best practices, performance benchmarks and tools for creating and evaluating sustainable landscapes. Successful projects are recognized with certification. Developed over seven years with input from hundreds of organizations and thousands of professionals, SITES v2 incorporates lessons learned from 100-plus pilot projects that field-tested the 2009 rating system. [6.13.14]
 



Green Infrastructure Ontario Coalition (GIO)

Cities need living green infrastructure as well as grey. The federal government has made a strong commitment to funding infrastructure across Canada with its announcement of $14B over 10 years from the Building Canada Fund. Getting the most from our investments in national infrastructure, however, requires including support for living green infrastructure as well as traditional grey infrastructure. Increased investment in grey infrastructure like roads and transit is much needed, but Canada is falling behind countries like the United States in funding living green infrastructure. The current focus on grey infrastructure should not dictate how infrastructure is conceived for the next 10 years. Living green infrastructure is a different way of thinking about infrastructure. It is a multi-scale network of ecological features that provide a wealth of benefits to our communities. Living green infrastructure includes everything from natural vegetative systems such as tree-lined streets or urban parks, to green technologies such as green roofs and permeable pavement. All of these elements combine to form a natural network that helps clean our air and water. [2.18.14]



GRHC (Green Roofs for Healthy Cities)

With much of North America facing extreme water shortages, Green Roofs for Healthy Cities (GRHC) is pleased to announce the launch of Net Zero Water for Buildings and Sites at CitiesAlive: 13th Annual Green Roof & Wall Conference in New York City on October 4th and 5th. Net Zero Water is an intensive two-day training program that provides detailed technical information on water management systems that allow designers to engineer buildings with the goal of achieving independence from municipal infrastructure, through a combination of rainfall harvesting, aggressive conservation, onsite treatment, storage and water recycling. [8.18.15]

 

In October, Green Roofs for Healthy Cities will finally be taking a bite out of the ‘Big Apple’ with its 13th Annual CitiesAlive Conference, Awards and Trade Show coming to New York City from the 5th to the 8th. New York has in terms of scale, the biggest market with the most designers and the greatest number of cool projects to see anywhere in the WORLD. We have a really great program located at the newly renovated Brooklyn Marriott Hotel, just a short walk from the historic Brooklyn Bridge and Pier. The trade show runs Monday evening and Tuesday afternoon, and will incorporate book launches, including an exciting new work by award winning photographer Brad Temkin, as well as research posters and technical product sessions. Once again as a Green Roofs for Healthy Cities (GRHC) Media Sponsor for CitiesAlive, we here at Greenroofs.com want to let you know about this Early Bird Discount for the 2015 CitiesAlive Green Roof and Wall Conference in New York City – take advantage by Wednesday, July 15! Register here by July 15th to receive the first early bird rate – the lowest rates to attend CitiesAlive. Use discount code CA2015EARLYBIRD. [7.13.15]

 

Green Roofs for Healthy Cities, the green roof and wall industry association announces Washington DC as #1 for most green roofs installed in 2014 in its Annual Green Roof Industry Survey. The City of Toronto takes the #2 spot. The Washington DC Metropolitan Region saw the installation of 1,207,115 square feet of green roofs in 2014. Washington has adopted public policies and programs that support green roof investment, including rebates of $7-$15 per square foot per green roof installed and credits that reduce stormwater fees. Public investment in green roofs yields multiple public cost saving benefits. For the first time ever, Toronto has ranked 2nd amongst North American cities, with 775,216 square feet of green roofs installed. The Toronto Green Roof by-law of 2009 requiring green roofs on most new buildings has resulted in the permitting of more than 2 million square feet of green roofs. [5.13.15]

 

First Net Zero Water Training Boot Camp to Launch at CitiesAlive. Green Roofs for Healthy Cities, a non-profit industry association dedicated to the development of the green roof and wall industry, is proud to announce the launch of the two day intensive Net Zero Water Boot Camp professional training at CitiesAlive in Nashville, Tennessee on November 11-12 at the Civic Design Center. The Net Zero Water Boot Camp is the curriculum associated with designing integrated water systems that work towards the goal of freeing a facility from the need to connect to the municipal water and wastewater system. Very few buildings around the world have accomplished this feat, yet it remains a critical component of moving towards greater resiliency, and it is a requirement under the Cascadia Green Building Council’s Living Building Challenge. [9.26.14]

 

Green Roofs for Healthy Cities (GRHC), the green roof and wall industry association announces a 10 percent growth rate for green roofs in 2013 in its Annual Green Roof Industry Survey. The 2013 results from GRHC's Annual Green Roof Industry Survey are in. You can also view hi-res charts of the growth of the industry and the top 10 metro regions in 2013 for green roofs installed. [4.24.14]

 

Green Roofs for Healthy Cities (GRHC) invites you to submit a paper for presentation at the 12th Annual CitiesAlive Green Roof and Wall Conference in Nashville, November 12-15, 2014. The theme of the conference for this year is Water: the Key to Everything Green. Join everyone in Nashville, a city dedicated to mitigating urban flooding due to rainfall through the use of green infrastructure. By participating as a presenter, you can help us achieve our goal of providing an exceptional conference that informs and educates other designers, policy makers, researchers and other types of professionals in North America about the latest advances in green infrastructure that will help solve our water issues. [1.3.14]
 



Minnesota Green Roofs Council (MGRC)


The Minnesota Green Roofs Council (MGRC), a not-for-profit organization dedicated to advancing green roofs in Minnesota, announced the election of John Hink to its board of directors. Hink is president and chief executive officer of Solution Blue (St. Paul, Minn.), a full-service civil engineering and landscape architecture firm specializing in sustainable site design and development. [12.10.14]

Green Roofs for Healthy Cities (GRHC) and the Minnesota Green Roofs Council (MGRC) announced that they will conduct the Minnesota Green Roof Symposium on Thursday, June 19, 2014. The Symposium will take place at the Anderson Center (Room 112) on the campus of Hamline University in St. Paul, Minn. from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The Symposium will give participants the opportunity to learn about green roofs and explore how to make Minnesota a leader in the application of green roofs to benefit the state’s environment and economy. [5.21.14]

Minnesota Green Roofs Council Elects New Nine-Member Board. The Minnesota Green Roofs Council (MGRC), a not-for-profit organization dedicated to advancing green roofs as a building strategy in Minnesota, announced the election of its nine-member board for 2014. "The Council’s leaders are a diverse, dynamic team with strong professional backgrounds and a shared commitment to green roofs for their many environmental and aesthetic benefits," said Karen Jensen, environmental analyst, Metropolitan Council (St. Paul, Minn.) and outgoing president of the MGRC. "I will continue to support their efforts because green roofs help improve the quality of our region’s critical water resources, particularly by reducing stormwater runoff in highly urbanized areas." [1.27.14] 



NAHB (N
ational Association of Home Builders)

The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) 50+ Housing Council announced the winners of its 2015 Best of 50+ Housing Awards, honoring excellence and innovation in the design, development, lifestyle and marketing of housing that appeals to the mature market. The annual awards program, held during the International Builders’ Show (IBS) in Las Vegas, showcases the latest trends in housing for that market sector. Top honors went to Sun City Yokohama Minami in Yokohama, Japan, a six-story independent living residence. A large central courtyard with a water feature serves as the focus for the layout of the major public spaces, as it is visible from dining areas, the tea lounge and the library. The building includes amenities such as a spa and wellness center. Residents also have access to all the public facilities of the main building, including multiple dining venues, indoor pool and spa, library and conservatory, among others. Its many sustainable building elements include green roofs, high-efficiency lighting and climate controls, operable windows, a dual water system, durable exterior materials and upgraded wall and roof installation systems. [1.22.15]



NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration)

NASA plays an increasingly important role in research into climate change and its potential impacts on the quality of life on earth. This includes several thrusts of research into the impact on urban life on climate change. One such effort at NASA involves utilizing green (a.k.a. vegetated) roofs. NASA’s research reveals that roofs covered with vegetation provide a cleaner environment, energy savings, and increased insulation. Additionally, utilization of green roofs can dramatically reduce the surface temperature of urban environments, something critically important for elderly and other sensitive populations. 


 

NRCA (National Roofing Contractors Association)

NRCA offers vegetative roof systems manual. The NRCA Vegetative Roof Systems Manual, Second Edition, addresses cutting-edge technologies available for vegetative roof systems, including the waterproofing system and its associated components, such as a protection course, a root barrier, a drainage layer, thermal insulation and an aeration layer, and an overburden of growth medium and plantings. Best practices are included for the design and installation of extensive, semi-intensive and intensive vegetative roof systems. [11.18.12]  



NRDC (Natural Resources Defense Council)

DC Water Announces New Proposal to Clean Up Rivers Using Green Infrastructure Instead of Tunnels. DC Water, who operates the system, signed a legal agreement in 2005 to build massive underground tunnels that will store this sewage-rainwater combination until it can be sent to the District's sewage treatment plant at Blue Plains. Construction has already started on one of the tunnels, which will prevent overflows into the Anacostia River. That tunnel will go into operation in 2022. DC Water announced a new direction for the remainder of what it calls the "Clean Rivers Project." The Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Justice have given DC Water the thumbs up to eliminate or downsize the tunnels that were planned for the Potomac River and Rock Creek and use green infrastructure to capture rainfall instead. [5.21.15]



SERF (Society of Environmentally Responsible Facilities)

The Society of Environmentally Responsible Facilities (SERF) announced its launch into the Chicago market. The East Lansing, Mich.-based green building certification organization brings affordable, streamlined and accessible environmental certification to the metro's building owners, managers and developers. As part of SERF's Chicago launch, it is certifying two Chicago buildings: the office portion of the iconic 330 North Wabash building and Norcon Construction headquarters. Additionally, the organization established a Chicago office and appointed a regional director to oversee operations and outreach efforts for the region. [3.14.12] 



Smart Growth America

Through a grant from the U.S. EPA’s Office of Sustainable Communities’ Building Blocks for Sustainable Communities Program, Smart Growth America is pleased to offer free technical assistance to help communities implement smart growth strategies to build stronger economies while protecting human health and the environment. Any unit or subdivision of local, tribal or regional government is eligible to apply. The deadline for Smart Growth America Technical Assistance applications is October 26, 2011 at 5:00 PM EDT. [10.3.11] 



SPRI (Single Ply Roofing Industry)

For the past three and a half years, Kelly Luckett, President of Green Roof Blocks and Chairman of the Technical Committee for Green Roofs for Healthy Cities, has been working with the Single Ply Roofing Industry to develop the ANSI/SPRI RP-14 Wind Design Standard for Vegetative Roofing Systems. The standard represents a consensus of over 50 industry experts and stakeholders and received approval as an American National Standard on June 3rd, 2010, from the American National Standard Institute (ANSI). The standard will be submitted for inclusion in the International Building Code as a provision in a new section of the building code entitled IGCC: Safe and Sustainable by the Book. The complete standard, in addition to the supporting wind tunnel testing report, is available for downloading from Green Roof Block's website, www.greenroofblocks.com, and at http://greenpaks.com/downloadsandcalculators.html



State of Alaska

Stormwater management techniques are also called low impact development or green infrastructure. These techniques use plants and bioengineered landscape features to manage stormwater runoff on-site, filter out debris and pollutants, protect salmon habitat, and keep drinking water clean. Green roofs provide a vegetative cover instead of an impervious surface. Vegetation absorbs runoff that can pollute waterways and cause problems with flooding and erosion. A new green roof incentive has been unveiled in the Matanuska-Susitna Borough in Alaska. The Mast-Su LID Program offers to match half of the cost of a green roof, up to a maximum reimbursement of $500. Click here for more information. [10.11.12]  



State of Illinois (EPA)

Governor Pat Quinn announced more than $5 million in investments to 13 communities across Illinois for green infrastructure improvement projects. Illinois Green Infrastructure Grants (IGIG) are designed to support projects that reduce the amount of pollution running into Illinois waterways from stormwater sources and reduce the risk of localized flooding. This announcement is part of Governor Quinn’s agenda to protect our natural resources and ensure a clean and healthy environment for future generations, while creating construction jobs. 2013 is the third year of IGIG and the program has previously awarded more than $9 million to 23 green infrastructure projects around the state. Included among the many improvements these projects have made are the installation of nearly 150 cisterns or rain barrels, 220 downspouts, 184 rain gardens, four green roofs, three urban wetlands and six acres of permeable pavement. [9.26.13]



State of Massachusetts

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has just released a bid for landscaping and outdoor products that includes a category for Green Roof and Living Wall Materials and Supplies (Category 5). The solicitation document number for the bid is FAC79. On Monday, April 8, the state will be holding a webinar for interested bidders at 11 am Eastern Time. For information on the webinar, see Section 2 of the Request for Response document posted as part of the solicitation specifications.  



State of New Jersey

Legislation sponsored by Assembly Democrats Wayne DeAngelo, Nancy Pinkin, Tim Eustace and L. Grace Spencer designed to encourage the creation of environmentally friendly buildings was recently approved, 71-3, by the Assembly. The bill (A-2305) aims to promote the incorporation of blue and green roofs into the design of new and existing buildings. Blue and green roofs use vegetation or mechanical devices to prevent roof water from draining too quickly, not only to improve storm water management but also to provide cost saving opportunities such as more efficient energy usage for heating and cooling. [12.17.14]



State of Tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation will once again partner with the Tennessee Stormwater Association (TNSA), the Tennessee Valley Authority and the Tennessee Department of Transportation to offer a grant program designed to help local governments fund green infrastructure and low-impact development projects. A total of $103,080 in grant funds will be available for allocation this year. Grants ranging from $10,000 to $30,000 will be awarded to local governments through a competitive process for projects such as rain gardens, green roofs, pervious concrete applications, trees and tree boxes, in addition to outreach and education efforts designed to promote green development in Tennessee communities. The grants require a 20 percent local match. [8.11.14]



TD Economics

TD Economics has released a report that looks at the Value of Urban Forests in Cities Across Canada. The Environmental Value of Urban Forests in Cities Across Canada shows that urban forests do much more than green our neighbourhoods. TD Economics has determined that: At $16 million per year, Montreal's trees help to reduce the city's water treatment bill by over four per cent per year, For each dollar spent on forestry in Greater Vancouver, residents received at least $4.59 in benefits each year, and Halifax receives almost $13 in annual benefits for every dollar spent on forestry. [9.24.14] 



USDA (United States Department of Agriculture)

The National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council (NUCFAC), announced the posting of the U.S. Forest Service FY 2014 Urban and Community Forestry Challenge Cost Share grant program. This year, there are three grant categories:

  1. Making Urban Trees and Forests More Resilient to the Impacts of Natural Disasters and the Long-term Impacts of Climate Change

  2. Green Infrastructure Jobs Analysis

  3. Utilizing Green Infrastructure to Manage and Mitigate Stormwater to Improve Water Quality

This year the grant proposals will be due July 15, 2013. We plan to announce future grant “Requests for Proposals” in January of each year. The 2014 Urban and Community Forestry Challenge Cost Share Grant Information is posted on the National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council’s Website: www.fs.fed.us/ucf/nucfac and Grants.gov www.grants.gov. Search [CFDA number: 10.675], or [Grant Opportunity No.: USDA-FS-UCF-01-2014]. An applicant may apply to more than one category; however they are to use a separate application for each category. The purpose of these grants is to address national issues. This RFP is not for local or State-wide projects. Please contact your Forest Service Regional Urban Forestry Program Manager, if you are interested in applying and have any questions. The Forest Service Regional Urban forestry Coordinators are located: http://www.fs.fed.us/ucf/contact_regional.html. [6.3.13]



US Department of Energy (Energy.gov)

In the latest effort to continue that push, President Obama has signed an executive order that will help us stay on track to meet the new target pledged in China and ensure that the federal government leads by example as the United States moves boldly to reduce greenhouse gas emissions while boosting clean energy. This new sustainability plan for the next decade directs federal agencies to cut their greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent by 2025. That means big cuts to the dangerous emissions driving climate change -- and also big savings. In addition to 21 million metric tons of emission reductions -- the same as taking 4.2 million cars of the road for a year -- achieving this goal will save taxpayers up to $18 billion in avoided energy costs between 2008 and 2025. The order affects not only buildings, but also calls for greater water efficiency and stormwater management—including green roofs and other green infrastructure--on federal properties. [3.19.15]  



USGBC (United States Green Building Council)

The U.S. Green Building Council is committed to a prosperous and sustainable future through cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings. Their community of leaders is working to make green buildings available to everyone within a generation. The U. S. Green Building Council (USGBC) named its Top 10 list of green building legislation honoring the bipartisan work of both the Senate and House of Representatives members who have introduced key energy efficiency and building legislation for 2009. See the list and read more from RealEstateRama. [2.25.10]

 


International
 

ASTM International

ASTM International Committee D08 on Roofing and Waterproofing, through its Subcommittee D08.24 on Sustainability, is developing several standards for sustainable roofing systems. One such standard is ASTM WK26599, Guide for Design of Sustainable, Low-Slope Roofing Systems. “The proposed standard embraces the fact that the primary purpose of the roofing system is to protect the top of the structure over the course of the roof’s design life, and that sustainable considerations such as use of the roof for water collection, vegetation, photovoltaics or use of newer or recycled products deemed environmentally friendly must not sacrifice this key aspect,” says Eric Olson, consulting engineer, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc. [10.18.13]



Australia

A University of Melbourne study shows that glancing at a grassy green roof for only 40 seconds markedly boosts concentration. The study, published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology, gave 150 students a boring, attention-sapping task. The students were asked to press a key as a series of numbers repeatedly flashed on a computer screen, unless that number was three. They were given a 40-second break midway through the task to view a city rooftop scene. Half the group viewed a flowering meadow green roof, the other half looked out onto a bare concrete roof. After the break, students who glanced at the greener vista made significantly less errors and demonstrated superior concentration on the second half of the task, compared to those who viewed the concrete roof. The green roof provided a restorative experience that boosted those mental resources that control attention, researchers concluded." [5.25.15]

The Growing Green Guide: A guide to green roofs, walls and facades in Melbourne and Victoria is now available. The guidelines have been written for Melbourne and Victoria but much of this information has national and international relevance. The Growing Green Guide team has issued an open invitation to others to use the guidelines’ contents to develop additional resources, or even produce a second version through their Creative Commons licensing. This guide is only one of three main outputs developed by the Growing Green Guide project team – a policy options paper and feasibility study and design for four demonstration sites have also been completed. On their website you will find the comprehensive policy options paper for use by government and others in developing policies to encourage green roofs and walls and an opportunities assessment for demonstration green roof and wall sites in each partner council’s municipality. While the publication of the guidelines marks the completion of the Growing Green Guide team’s planned work, this is not the end of the Growing Green Guide project; it is the start of mainstreaming green roofs and walls into our built environment. [2.21.14]   



Bulgaria

A new Green Roofs Construction Association has emerged in Bulgaria. The new association is aimed at promoting the benefits of green roofs for both energy efficiency and sustainability. The newly created Bulgarian Green Roofs Construction Association launched its activity with a presentation of DIADEM systems. It will also represent and protect the interests of its members in order to create a good environment for the development of the sector. [5.18.12] 



EFB (European Federation of Green Roof Associations)

The EFB is an organisation that brings Europe's green roof associations together. The ten associations promote and encourage the uptake of green roofs in their countries to help address issues related to climate change, ecosystem services, green infrastructure and lack of green space in the built environment. The Association also reaches out to non-member countries to facilitate the growth in green roofs and the establishment of an national association. Interested non-member individuals, companies and public bodies can contact our office for advice and help.

The original green roof associations of Austria, Germany and Switzerland established the European Federation in 1997. Since then the following associations have joined: Dutch, Belgian, Scandinavian, Hungarian, Italian, Polish and British associations.



France

Rooftops on new buildings built in commercial zones in France must either be partially covered in plants or solar panels, under a new law. Green roofs have an isolating effect, helping reduce the amount of energy needed to heat a building in winter and cool it in summer. The argument for divesting from fossil fuels is becoming overwhelming. They also retain rainwater, thus helping reduce problems with runoff, while favouring biodiversity and giving birds a place to nest in the urban jungle, ecologists say. The law approved by parliament was more limited in scope than initial calls by French environmental activists to make green roofs that cover the entire surface mandatory on all new buildings. The Socialist government convinced activists to limit the scope of the law to commercial buildings. The law was also made less onerous for businesses by requiring only part of the roof to be covered with plants, and giving them the choice of installing solar panels to generate electricity instead. [3.19.15]  
 



Global Industry Analysts

Preference for Eco-Friendly Roofing Solutions Drives the Global Roofing Market, According to New Report by Global Industry Analysts, Inc. GIA launches comprehensive analysis of industry segments, trends, growth drivers, market share, market size and demand forecasts on the Roofing market. Global market for Roofing is projected to reach US$90 billion by 2020, driven by rapid urbanization, and growing focus on energy efficient construction. [1.13.15]   
 



ICC (International Code Council)


The ICC Council provides access to new “California Solar Permitting Guidebook” that makes permit review, installation of solar pv systems in California easier. The State of California Guidebook is available as a free download or in print from the Code Council, and addresses permitting requirements, and assists installers and code officials. The guide focuses on the permit review and approval to install a solar PV system. It highlights solar PV installations on residential and commercial building rooftops, in parking lots and on parking structures, and those mounted on the ground. Each of these has specific installation requirements addressed in the guide. Although the combination of solar and greenroofs together are not yet addressed, they could be in the future. [9.19.12]



IGRA (International Green Roof Association)

Are you on the eNewsletter list of IGRA – the International Green Roof Association? If not, you’re missing a great IGRA journal with their recently published IGRA Green Roof News 2/2015…while the 43-page issue is full of informative articles and case studies, it’s main focus is on Urban Green Roof Policies. [8.11.15]

 

Life on roofs - recreation, sports and fun - this is the main theme of the current issue of Green Roof News 1 - 2014 and we’ll be showcasing the manifold usage possibilities with examples from Singapore, Istanbul, Berlin and Copenhagen. Ski slopes, golf courses, swimming pools or playgrounds on roofs – all of these examples follow the tradition of the Swiss-French architectural theorist Le Corbusier by making roof gardens preferred gathering places on buildings. If we change the colour from green to white: There have been many discussions about white roofs to respond to the challenges of climate change and the urban heat island effect. Let us take a look on a scientific study and the results to be prepared for further debates. For the first time you will find a research review of the year 2013 with selected articles from the international pool of publications. Apart from that, we will put a spotlight on the causes for the Riga supermarket roof collapse. And we will present Green Roof projects from different countries and feature some interesting green building events. [4.21.14]
 



Israel

 

The University of Haifa has dedicated Israel’s first research center for Green Roofs Ecology, which will focus on research and development of non-irrigated green roofs; improving biological diversity with green roofs; and developing ecological and evolutionary theories. The center has been established thanks to a generous gift from a British expert in the field, and was facilitated by VP for External Relations and Resource Development Amos Gaver. Over recent years, awareness of the “green roofs” gardening method atop building roofs has increased. It is intended to enhance a building’s energy efficiency while minimizing environmental damage. The rooftop vegetation creates better insulation for the building, which lowers air conditioning and/or heating consumption; improves photosynthesis in the city; and of course serves as an urban living space for various animals. [12.26.12]
 


 

Korea

 

The mission for the Korea Green Roof & Infrastructure Association (KOGRIA) is to foster cooperation among governmental as well as private organizations, research institutes, educational institutions, and green roof companies for the Construction of Urban Green Space for the Future. At first, we came together to discuss the issue on Urban Green Space Project, aiming to change our desolated city filled with grey concrete into lively one with greening. Then, we reached a conclusion; R&D for the advanced green technologies and its distribution are the most realistic as well as idealistic solution. In an effort to find the best ways to proceed with it, we organized “Association for Study on Green Roof,” and released many presentations as well as articles for Roof Greening periodically. Also, we hosted lots of symposiums and seminars, inviting relevant professionals to introduce the needs of roof greening system, the techniques as well as methods, and good examples on it. With our continuous activities, research and studies on Green Roof Project, finally, we officially established Korea Green Roof & Infrastructure Association (KOGRIA) with authorization of Ministry of Environment on Jan, 2003. Since then, KOGRIA has constantly tried to create new urban green spaces based on the outcomes and experiences through our studies. [12.29.12]

 


 

Mexico

 

From Green Roofs to Designated Pet-Friendly Spaces, Mexico's Capital is Taking Action to provide a more Sustainable and Enjoyable Environment for Visitors and Residents alike. To create a green urban infrastructure, azoteas verdes — or green roofs — are sprouting across this sprawling metropolis in an effort to freshen the air. Mexico City has reported over 240 green rooftops and the city is listed second in Latin America for cities with the largest number of urban crops by the Food and Agriculture Organization. Rooftops are actively "greening" across Mexico City's urban area featuring hydroponic gardens and succulent plants to help reduce the impact of air pollutants. So far, beds of succulents have been planted on more than 132,000 square feet of rooftops over schools, hospitals, the city's Natural History Museum, and other civic buildings. Some of Mexico City's largest corporate buildings also host green rooftops. [5.29.15]

 


 

RnRMarketResearch.com

 

Green Roof Market 2021 Forecasts and 15 Company Profiles. RnRMarketResearch.com adds Global Green Roof Market Report 2015 about the trends and size of green-roof industry under the collection of construction market intelligence research reports of its online library. Complete report on green roof market spread across 116 pages, profiling 15 companies and supported with 143 tables and figures is now available. The Global Green Roof Market Report 2015 is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the green-roof industry. The report provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The green roof market analysis is provided for the China markets including development trends, competitive landscape analysis, and key regions development status. Development policies and plans are discussed as well as manufacturing processes and Bill of Materials cost structures are also analyzed. This report also states import/export consumption, supply and demand Figures, cost, price, revenue and gross margins. [8.6.15] 

 


 

Technavio

 

Technavio Says Rapid Growth in Construction Activity Will Generate Significant Demand in the Global Roofing Materials Market Through 2019. The new Technavio report also emphasizes green roofing. Green roofing involves covering the roof of a building with vegetation that is planted over a waterproof membrane. Green roofs save on energy used for cooling and heating inside the building and act as insulators by absorbing heat. A green roof is more expensive than conventional roofing materials, but it can offset the cost in the long run by saving energy, filtering rainwater runoff, and also has a longer life than other roofing materials. Technavio is a leading technology research and advisory company with a global coverage. We focus on emerging technology trends that can shape the market. We identify and explain these trends to our customers to help them make better decisions. [6.26.15]
 



UK - The Green Roof Organisation (GRO)


The team at Groundwork Sheffield and the Green Roof Centre in the UK have been at it again. Following the launch of the GRO Green Roof Code for the UK in February, March brings the Green Roof Guide. The Guide is designed to sit alongside the GRO Code as a more accessible route to the technical information the Code holds. Once again the project was funded by the European Commission Life+ fund and Groundwork Sheffield, with financial support from the Homes and Communities Agency and Livingroofs.org. The Green Roof Guide is designed to enable people to get the answers they need about their green roof project, whatever its size. By simply clicking on the relevant question under each topic most common concerns can be resolved. Any part of the guide can then be saved or printed out as a PDF, and all of the information is free to all users. [3.3.11]



Lux Research

Innovation Will Drive Costs of Green Roofs and Walls by 28% in 2017. Combining diverse approaches can cut costs to $23/ft2 but building-integrated vegetation (BIV) will still depend on incentives for wider adoption, says Lux Research. Building-integrated vegetation (BIV) – the use of green roofs and green walls to improve air quality, manage storm-water and generate energy savings – is experiencing a burst of innovation to lower costs and hasten payback on investment, according to Lux Research. In the drive to demonstrate economic value, the $6 billion industry has come up with a number of new ways to reduce material, installation and maintenance costs. All told, costs could be cut 28% -- from $38/ ft2 in 2012 to $23/ft2 in 2017, according to a Lux Research analysis. [8.19.14]



WGIN (World Green Infrastructure Network)

WGIN is a non-profit industry association of industry associations from around the world whose mission is to support the development of industry associations that support the development of green roofs and walls. Its operating language is English, but its members speak multiple languages. Each year WGIN supports a regional or world congress that brings together experts from different countries to share information about green roof and wall projects, research and policy.

Member countries are Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, India, Iran, Italy, Israel, Japan, South Korea, Mexico, New Zealand, Poland, South Africa, Spain, and Taiwan.



Worldwide

Landscape architecture is more than a green garnish. It can generate an ecosystem of parks, streets, squares, woodland and waterways to make cities healthier, safer and richer. Arup, the global engineering, planning and design business, has been redefining urban planning by gathering existing research into a major report, Cities Alive, that shows the social, economic and environmental benefits of green infrastructure and how it applies to new developments or retrofitting. The company argues green space is being sliced out of design briefs to cut costs because it’s seen as purely aesthetic and a “token decorative garnish”. Cities Alive, launched in 2014, recognises that money talks, but highlights the value of green infrastructure to planners, architects, designers, as well as developers, public authorities, landowners and users. It defines green infrastructure as integrated networks of open spaces, woodland and parks, green streets, squares, healthy waterways, cycle ways and pedestrian routes as well as green roofs, walls and facades. [4.30.15]



 

 

 

 

 

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