Greenroofs.com Project of the Week for October 23, 2017: 38 Dolores

October 23, 2017 at 12:48 pm

Greenroofs.com Project Week October 23 2017 38 Dolores San Francisco

38 Dolores
San Francisco, CA, USA
15,700 sf greenroofs, 72 sf greenwall, plus multiple green infrastructure elements

Greenroofs.com Project Week October 23 2017 38 Dolores San Francisco

Greenroofs.com Project of the Week: October 23, 2017

Mini Description & Details

38 Dolores is a socially vibrant urban habitat at the apex of San Francisco’s most diverse neighborhoods, the Castro/Mission district. Designed by William McDonough + Partners, BAR Architects, and April Phillips Design Works Landscape Architecture, the former vacant auto showroom was transformed into a LEED Gold certified mixed-use building with SITES Pilot 2 Star Certification.

38 Dolores has approximately 84 luxury residential rental condos, a 30,000 square foot Whole Foods Market, and parking levels for residential and retail. Sustainable strategies include daylighting, alternative energy technologies, two greenroofs with habitat for the local endangered Mission Blue butterfly and the San Bruno elfin butterfly as well as for human well-being, edible and stormwater gardens, and much more.

Greenroofs.com Project Week October 23 2017 38 Dolores San Francisco

Greenroofs.com Project Week October 23 2017 38 Dolores San Francisco

Designed by April Phillips Design Works, the 3rd level courtyard greenroof offers paved amenity spaces planted with drought tolerant ornamental species and an edible community garden with intensive planters. A Tournesol Siteworks VGM Greenwall offers an artistic focal point and provides a windbreak and comfortable microclimate at the main group seating area.  Learn more about the greenwall.

Edible fruit-producing trees set in custom metal tree collars allow extra depth for roots to extend into the intensive planting areas. Circular cutouts planted with a variety of sempervivum provide pops of color. The 4th level showcases a large semi-intensive American Hydrotech Garden Assembly greenroof planted with natives to attract endangered butterflies and pollinators with a lightweight soil depth of 4 to 12 inches. Both greenroofs utilize a sophisticated fertigation system and are served by a 16,000 gallon greywater and rainwater harvesting cistern.

Greenroofs.com Project Week October 23 2017 38 Dolores San Francisco

Greenroofs.com Project Week October 23 2017 38 Dolores San Francisco

More

The landscape mitigates stormwater management both at the street level with rain gardens and at the roof levels with the greenroofs, and the edible garden encourages residents to connect with nature in the city and with one another. 38 Dolores is a thriving and sustainable example of embracing sophisticated design with dense and efficient housing for multicultural city living.

Greenroofs.com Project Week October 23 2017 38 Dolores San Francisco

Greenroofs.com Project Week October 23 2017 38 Dolores San Francisco

Year: 2013
Owner: 
Prado Group
Location: 
San Francisco, CA, USA
Building Type: 
Multi-Use
Type: 
Extensive & Intensive
System: 
Other
Size: 
15700 sq.ft.
Slope: 
2%
Access: 
Accessible, Private

Greenroofs.com Project Week October 23 2017 38 Dolores San Francisco

Greenroofs.com Project Week October 23 2017 38 Dolores San Francisco

Designers/Manufacturers of Record:

Landscape Architect: APDW Landscape Architecture
Architect:
William McDonough + Partners
Architect:
BAR Architects
Structural Engineer:
Tipping Mar and Associates
Greenroof System:
Garden Roof Assembly, American Hydrotech
Landscape Contractor:
Valleycrest (Brightview)
Contractor:
Webcor
LEED Consultant:
Webcor Builders
Civil Engineer:
BKF Engineers
Irrigation:
Brookwater
Owner/Developer:
Prado Group
Greenwall System: VGM Greenwall, Tournesol Siteworks

Greenroofs.com Project Week October 23 2017 38 Dolores San Francisco

All the Info:

View 38 Dolores to see ALL of the Photos and Additional Information about this particular project in
The International Greenroof & Greenwall Projects Database.

Greenroofs.com Project Week October 23 2017 38 Dolores San Francisco

Project of the Week Video Feature

Watch the 38 Dolores Project of the Week Video below or see it on our GreenroofsTV channel on YouTube:

Greenroofs.com Project of the Week 10/23/17 video photo credits: Courtesy of Doug Dun/ BAR Architects; April Philips, FASLA, APDW Landscape Architecture; and 38 Dolores.

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Love the Earth, Plant a Roof (or Wall)!

By Linda S. Velazquez, ASLA, LEED AP, GRP
Greenroofs.com Publisher & Greenroofs & Walls of the World™ Virtual Summit Host

Round #2 is open!  Register now for the 50% off discounted rate of only $25 and join us online for our 2017 Virtual Summit through December, 2017.

Greenroofs.com Project Week October 23 2017 38 Dolores San Francisco

Project of the Week for June 13, 2016: Hotchkiss School Biomass Treatment Facility

June 13, 2016 at 8:01 am
Project of the Week Hotchkiss School Biomass Treatment Facility

Hotchkiss School Biomass Treatment Facility; Photo by © David Sundberg-ESTO. Courtesy of Centerbrook Architects. Click to learn more in The International Greenroof & Greenwall Projects Database.

Greenroofs.com Project of the Week: 6/13/16

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Hotchkiss School Biomass Treatment Facility
Lakeville, CT, USA
11,500 sf. Greenroof

Project of the Week Description & Details

Founded in 1891, the Hotchkiss School is an independent boarding school nestled in the beautiful northwest corner of Connecticut. Part of the school’s commitment to becoming a carbon-neutral campus by 2020, a state-of-the-art biomass central heating facility was built in 2012 to replace an aging steam plant. Located between a golf course and marshes, the new LEED Gold certified Hotchkiss School’s Biomass Treatment Center provides heating for the entire preparatory school which includes 85 buildings and approximately 600 residents. Designed by Centerbrook Architects, the architect of record, the low profile power plant is sited at the bottom of a sloping landscape and sports a highly visible undulating green roof. The treatment center burns woodchips and reduces greenhouse gas emissions by a third to a half compared to the oil-fired boiler it replaced; in fact, the school has cut a six-figure sum from its winter energy bill.

Project of the Week Hotchkiss School Biomass Treatment Facility

Photo by © David Sundberg-ESTO. Courtesy of Centerbrook Architects.

Installed in July, 2012 by Apex Green Roofs, the ZinCo USA Sedum Carpet green roof system on the biomass plant sits on top of a Sika Sarnafil waterproofing membrane. Due to the use of precultivated sedum mats which were laid directly onto the green roof substrate, the roof was covered by vegetation quickly. Designed for a combination of aesthetics and ecological value, its distinctive wavy living roof provides captures 50% of the site’s rainwater. And bioswales combine with rain gardens to further slow and filter rainwater before it enters the ground. Considered an immediate icon in sustainable commercial construction, the Hotchkiss School’s Biomass Treatment Center’s serpentine green roof is an exciting addition to an already beautiful campus, merging with the surrounding landscape, and protecting nearby wetlands from associated erosion and pollution.

Project of the Week Hotchkiss School Biomass Treatment Facility

Year: 2012
Owner: Hotchkiss School
Location: Lakeville, CT, USA
Building Type: Other
Type: Extensive
System: Single Source
Size: 11500 sq.ft.
Slope: 17%
Access: Inaccessible, Private

Project of the Week Hotchkiss School Biomass Treatment Facility

Hotchkiss School Biomass Treatment Facility; Photo by © David Sundberg-ESTO. Courtesy of Centerbrook Architects.

Project of the Week Hotchkiss School Biomass Treatment Facility

Photo by © David Sundberg-ESTO. Courtesy of Centerbrook Architects.

Designers/Manufacturers of Record:

Architect: Centerbrook Architects
Greenroof System: ZinCo USA Sedum Carpet System
Waterproofing Manufacturer: Sika Sarnafil
Waterproofing Membrane Contractor: Greenwood Industries
Greenroof Installation: Apex Green Roofs
Civil Engineer: Milone & MacBroom
Structural Engineer: DeStefano & Chamberlain
MEP Engineer: Van Zelm Engineers
LEED/Commissioning Consultant: The Stone House Group
Construction Management: O&G Industries

Project of the Week Hotchkiss School Biomass Treatment Facility

Project of the Week Hotchkiss School Biomass Treatment Facility

View the PROJECT PROFILE to see ALL of the Photos and Additional Information about this particular project in The International Greenroof & Greenwall Projects Database.

Project of the Week Hotchkiss School Biomass Treatment Facility

Project of the Week Video Feature

Watch the Hotchkiss School Biomass Treatment Facility Project of the Week Video below or see it on our GreenroofsTV channel on YouTube:

Did we miss your contribution? Please let us know to add you to the profile.

Would you like one of your projects to be featured on Greenroofs.com? We have to have a profile first! Submit Your Project Profile.

Love the Earth, Plant a Roof (or Wall)!

By Linda S. Velazquez, ASLA, LEED AP, GRP
Greenroofs.com Publisher

London Olympic Park: Star of the Show

August 7, 2012 at 5:34 pm

By  Dr. Nigel Dunnett
Professor of Planting Design and Vegetation Technology
Director, The Green Roof Centre
Department of Landscape
University of Sheffield

The London Olympic Park is the largest new urban park to be created in Europe for 150 years.  For the first time in Olympic history, the park is as important as the buildings, and for many people it is the star of the show.

Although none of the main sporting venues have green roofs, they have been used widely on the athlete’s village.  However, because of the huge security operation carried out during the building of the games, and during the operation of the games, access and publicity has been virtually non-existent.

Yet, there is a very prominent living wall next to the Olympic Velodrome.  Composed of a vertical sedum mat system, it has been fertilised and irrigated to the point that it presents a verdant bright green, highly textural surface.

In my opinion, although this is not the best approach to take for widespread use, it has definitely raised the profile of living walls:  the crowds of people of have felt it, examined it and photographed are a testament to that.  

I have been involved with the planting in the Olympic Park from the outset in 2007, responsible with my colleague James Hitchmough, for developing the overall planting strategy for the park, and then producing the specifications for vegetation mixes, and, over the last two years, working on site with the landscape contractors to install and manage the plantings.

Unlike most urban parks – where mown lawns are the norm with groups of standard trees, and if there are any wild areas, they tend to be hidden away from the high profile locations – the Olympic Park turns this concept on its head, with meadows, woodlands and wetlands being the main planting types within which sit areas of spectator lawns, where huge outdoor TV screens relay the action.

From the outset we wanted to make this a very forward-looking park, and highly ecological and sustainable.  It has been a major challenge: everything had to be flowering and performing at its best on the day of the opening ceremony on July 27, 2012 and then to continue looking good for a further 7 weeks right through to the end of the Paralympics.

We made the meadows flower-rich, partly to create a visual spectacle for the 5 million visitors who will be at the site over the summer, but also to attract as many pollinating insects as possible.

In fact, biodiversity considerations have been paramount: the park only received planning permission because it had a biodiversity action plan to create 125 acres of new native habitat (this makes up nearly all of the greenspace of the park).  Even the McDonald’s is set in a flowering meadow!

For the first time in the UK, water-senstive design principles lie at the heart of the design of a major public park. The Landform in the park is dramatic, with a series of artificial hills and valleys.  All the runoff from the hills drains to bioswales, which also line all of the main paths through the park, and the main pedestrian concourse.

These swales are planted with species-rich wet meadow vegetation at their base. The water drains to collecting ponds and rain gardens.

The Olympic Park has been created on an area of derelict and contaminated land in east London.  When they visit, people are genuinely amazed by the sight and experience of millions of wildflowers all around them, covering such large areas, and surrounding the main Olympic Stadium and the other venues.

We hope this is a turning point in the way that we view urban landscapes in the UK: no stronger evidence is needed that people love flower-rich, natural surroundings than the response there has been to the park.

Dr. Nigel Dunnett
Professor of Planting Design and Vegetation Technology
Director, The Green Roof Centre
Department of Landscape
University of Sheffield
Weston Bank,  Sheffield  S10 2TN
Tel: 0114 2220611
n.dunnett@sheffield.ac.uk