Bee Research on Green Roofs in Asia, Europe, and North America by Michaela Hofmann and Susanne S. Renner

March 7, 2018 at 5:34 pm

A Personal View, by Michaela Hofmann

When you grow up on a farm, moving into a big city like Munich (with 1.5 million inhabitants) can feel like moving into a concrete desert.  However, only at first glance.

Between building fronts and paved roads, nature has gained a foothold.  But it was only when I began working on urban bees for my doctoral research that I became aware of a huge additional green space in modern cities, namely rooftops.

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One of the nesting aids that the researchers were trying out on the ground. Such sand heaps (even much smaller ones) would be a huge help for bees. Photo by Michaela Hofmann.

It is now mandatory for many types of buildings to have green roofs, and the aesthetic and climate benefits of this type of new urban habitat are obvious and well-documented.  But are there benefits for wild bees, the topic of my research?

The literature about effects of green roofs on biodiversity is surprisingly limited.  My search for studies about wild bees on green roofs in Asia, Europe and North America revealed that so far, only 35 studies (worldwide) have been carried out, which have identified 236 species that use man-made green roofs as foraging or nesting ground.  For comparison, there are 19,700 known bee species, and Germany alone has over 570 species.

The percentage of cavity-nesting bees on roofs is higher than that on nearby ground, while the percentage of pollen specialists is lower.  Data are almost completely lacking on the reproductive success of bees on green roofs, the effect of roof age on bee diversity, and the genetic or demographic benefits of increased habitat connectivity.

I am hoping that my list of the bee species so far reported on green roofs may help in the selection and implementation of suitable soils, nesting aids, and plantings. One reason for why green roofs are so important for insects, certainly in Germany, is that they receive less fertilizer, fewer pesticides, and fewer herbicides than most other urban and agricultural land.

I think this aspect may make green roofs scientifically interesting spaces to study the relative effects of different factors that contribute to the loss of insect diversity in Central Europe.

Bee species recorded between 1992 and 2017 from green roofs in Asia, Europe, and North America, with key characteristics and open research questions

By Michaela Hofmann* and Susanne S. Renner*
Systematic Botany and Mycology, Faculty of Biology, University of Munich (LMU)
*Joint corresponding authors

Publisher’s Note: The following article was reviewed by and posted on Apidologie 49(1): 00-00. DOI: 10.1007/s13592-017-0555-x on December 19, 2017

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A male Lasioglossum calceatum discovered on green roofs. Photo by Michaela Hofmann.

Abstract

Green roofs, which have become mandatory on new flat-topped buildings in many cities, increase habitat connectivity for wildlife and have contributed to a boom in urban bee keeping.  The ecological benefits or risks of green roofs for wild bees (bee species other than the domesticated honey bee, Apis mellifera), however, have not been comprehensively analyzed.

We therefore reviewed studies on insects caught on green roofs in Asia, Europe, and North America between 1992 and early 2017 and extracted information on wild bees.  The resulting species list includes 236 Apidae identified in 35 studies, with thermophilic species probably overrepresented because roofs provide warm and dry habitats.

The percentage of cavity-nesting bees on roofs is higher than on nearby ground, while the percentage of pollen-specialists is lower.  Data are almost completely lacking on the reproductive success of bees on green roofs, the effect of roof age on bee diversity, and the genetic or demographic benefits of increased habitat connectivity.  Our list of the bee species so far reported on green roofs will help in the selection and implementation of suitable soils, nesting aids, and plantings.

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Osmia caerulescens recorded on green roofs. Photo by Michaela Hofmann.

INTRODUCTION

The past 20 years have seen a dramatic increase in research on green roofs (reviewed in Bowler et al. 2010; and Blank et al. 2013), which are now mandatory on flat-topped buildings in Switzerland and a few other European countries, and supported by incentives in the United States (Brenneisen 2006; Stutz 2010).  Although there are different types of green roofs, one can generally distinguish between intensive and extensive roof greening.

Intensive green roofs usually have a soil layer of at least 15 cm and sometimes up to 60 cm or more (Mann 1994), while extensive green roofs have only a thin layer of soil (5 -15 cm), supporting mostly mosses, herbs, succulents, and grasses (Gedge and Kadas 2005).  Roofs with shallow soil layers are a difficult growing environment for plants because of moisture stress, severe drought, and full exposure to sun and wind (Schneider and Riedmiller 1992; Dunnett and Kingsbury 2008). On the other hand, extensive roofs require minimal maintenance and can be self-sustaining.

Ecosystem services from green roofs include stormwater management (Getter and Rowe 2008; Berndtsson 2010), moderation of the urban heat island effect (Takebayashi and Moriyama 2007; Tabares-Velasco et al. 2012), lower building temperatures (Oberndorfer et al. 2007), and a role as urban wildlife habitat (for reviews see Fernandez-Canero and Gonzalez-Redondo 2010; Williams et al. 2014; Gonsalves 2016).  An important aspect for the latter role is that green roofs are undisturbed by humans during most of the year, making them quiet habitats with low pesticide loads (Hui and Chan 2011).  They also increase habitat connectivity for certain arthropods (Braaker et al. 2014).

Of the many arthropods living on green roofs, bees stand out because of their role as pollinators and because urban beekeepers tend to find bee keeping “restorative and empowering” (Moore and Cost 2013).  While urban bee keeping has led to an increase of the density of honey bees in cities, the past 50 years have seen a decline in the abundance of wild bee species, attributed mostly to habitat loss and pesticides (Goulson et al. 2008), although data on change in bee abundances in urban spaces over time are scarce.  Wild bees, most of which are solitary bees, are expected to benefit from the newly created habitat on green roofs because they may be able to forage both on the ground and on green roofs, and thermophilic species might also find nesting opportunities on green roofs.

Surprisingly, however, the effects of green roofs on the diversity and abundance of wild bees in cities have received little attention despite repeated calls for bee-targeted green roof research (Zurbuchen and Müller 2012; Witt 2016).  We here provide the first list of bee species recorded from green roofs, summarize key ecological traits of these bees, and point to important open questions about the role of green roofs as habitat for solitary bees.

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A female Bombus sylvarum, found on green roofs in France. Photo by Michaela Hofmann.

Online Supporting Materials

Download the 26-page Hofmann-Renner 2017 Bee Research on Green Roofs PDF of Online Supporting Materials, Tables S1 (Table S1: Overview of green roof (= GR) studies involving wild bee species assessment-), S2 (Table S2: Alphabetical list of species reported on green roofs), and References.

 Bee Research Green Roofs Asia Europe North America Hofmann Renner
More Info

For more information and to read the entire study, you may purchase the Bee species recorded between 1992 and 2017 from green roofs in Asia, Europe, and North America, with key characteristics and open research questions PDF on Apidologie for $39.95, or contact the authors below.


~ Michaela Hofmann and Susanne S. Renner, 
Systematic Botany and Mycology, Faculty of Biology, University of Munich (LMU)

Our research focuses on the systematics, phylogenetics, and evolution of plants and fungi, especially their adaptation to biotic and abiotic factors. Methods brought to bear on these questions range from light and electron microscopy to molecular cytogenetics, field work, and next generation sequencing of entire genomes to study them comparatively.

Contact Michaela Hofmann, Systematic Botany and Mycology, Faculty of Biology, University of Munich (LMU), 80638, Munich, Germany at: michaela.hofmann@campus.lmu.de.

Contact Professor Dr. Susanne Renner, Faculty of Biology, University of Munich (LMU) at: renner@lmu.de.

Watch the Greenroofs & Walls of the World Virtual Summit 2015 Video: “Small Scale Green Roofs” by Dusty Gedge and John Little

October 6, 2016 at 11:55 am

If you want to hear from two highly engaging, knowledgeable, and entertaining Englishmen with varied, self-trained backgrounds in birds, plants, ecology, and green infrastructure plus understand how to construct DIY low-impact living roofs, then you simply cannot miss watching “Small Scale Green Roofs” by Dusty Gedge and John Little from our Greenroofs & Walls of the World Virtual Summit 2015 ~ Connecting the Planet with Living Architecture: People, Projects & Design above or on our VS2015 Virtual Summit 2015 playlist on our GreenroofsTV channel on YouTube.

It’s been over a year since we concluded our third Greenroofs & Walls of the World Virtual Summit, and as promised, we are now releasing the 23 videos from our 30+ international speakers to the general public.

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Filmed in Essex and London, Dusty and John’s collaborative video “Small Scale Green Roofs” is an important step for those of us who have been thinking of building our own greenroof atop a smaller structure, perhaps a shed or shipping container, for example.  Between the two of them, they have extensive experience which they are very happy to share.

By illustration, John’s company has built over 70 timber grass/greenroofs and Dusty has been working in the field since 1997.  Now with over 36 years combined experience of building living roofs, they discuss the opportunities of greening up small roofs both old and new.

Virtual Summit 2015 Video Small Scale Green Roofs Gedge Little

Their love of the subject is quite visible in this fun yet extremely informative video which also shows how to integrate animal biodiversity for invertebrates, pollinators, and others.

Virtual Summit 2015 Video Small Scale Green Roofs Gedge Little

Having written extensively in print and online, their work provides an inspiration for individuals who want to make a contribution themselves and also for those people who don’t yet have the confidence to build on their own.  Their experiences resulted in the minutely detailed small greenroofs guide (2005 and then 2014 for the web-based guide), providing advice and confidence for DIYers, and workshops followed allowing homeowners and small building and landscape contractors some great practical, hands-on advice.

Virtual Summit 2015 Video Small Scale Green Roofs Gedge Little

London, UK.  Dusty Gedge is a green roof campaigner and designer, who has actively promoted green roofs in the UK since 1997. He has designed a number of seminal roofs and helped develop the London Green Roof Policy. He is also the current President of the European Federation of Green Roof Associations (EFB), and sits on the EU’s working group for the green Infrastructure and ecosystem services policy. His work in Europe over the last few years working on a Pan-European green roof course and he is currently advising on a project on green roofs, pollinators and solar power – Biosolar Roofs. Update: The Biosolar program has completed its research.

Dusty is co-author of Small Green Roofs: Low-Tech Options for Greener Living, 2011 and DIY Guide to Green & Living Roofs, among other publications. In 2004 Dusty co-founded Livingroofs.org, a non-profit organisation established to promote, advise upon and seek research into green roofs and similar structures within the context of urban and rural regeneration. With John Little he has written a small-scale green roof guide to help individuals, buildings and landscape contractors to construct small wildlife friendly green roofs. He is also a designer of green roofs and other green infrastructure through his consultancy. Dusty is also a regular speaker at conferences through UK, Europe and the world.

As a birdwatcher first and foremost he has always had a vision that good green infrastructure and green roofs should deliver for biodiversity as well other headline issues connected with cities and climate change adaptation.  Dusty also co-presented “Biosolar Roofs” with Nathalie Baumann at the 2015 Virtual Summit.

Essex, UK. John Little is a landscape contractor and designer. He is well known in the UK for his seminal work on social housing estates, transforming one estate from an amenity grassland desert to wildlife friendly and food growing paradise. He is also well known for his work on small scale green roofs both delivered through his company the Grassroof Company.

John is co-author of Small Green Roofs: Low-Tech Options for Greener Living, 2011 and DIY Guide to Green & Living Roofs, among other publications. With Dusty Gedge he has written a small-scale green roof guide to help individuals, buildings and landscape contractors to construct small wildlife friendly green roofs. Greenroofshelters is another of John’s companies that provides modular small green roofed buildings. The type of buildings that company designs and sells include binshelters, bike sheds and small green roofed freight container buildings. One of these featured in Nigel Dunnett’s award winning garden at the Chelsea Flower show back in 2011.

John’s garden has featured in many garden and horticulture magazines. Full of wildflowers and now home a plethora of bee habitat walls and green roofs, it is an oasis of biodiversity in the heart of Essex.

Read about “Small Scale Green Roofs” by Dusty Gedge and John Little video’s 5 Key Learning Objectives which I identified for participants of the Virtual Summit 2015.

Virtual Summit 2015 Video Small Scale Green Roofs Gedge Little

We welcome your input and suggestions to make our Greenroofs & Walls of the World Virtual Summit 2017 more accessible, interactive, and a just better all around global social media experience!

~ Happy watching,

Linda S. Velazquez, ASLA, LEEP AP, GRP
Greenroofs.com Publisher

~ Also enjoy these released videos available now from our Greenroofs & Walls of the World Virtual Summit 2015 ~ Connecting the Planet with Living Architecture: People, Projects & Design:

“Social Healing with Greening” Panel – Part 2 with Patrick Carey and Darius Jones.

 “Social Healing with Greening” Panel – Part 1 with Patrick Carey, Peter Ensign, and George Irwin.

“Urban and Social Needs of Green” by Marc Grañén.

“Soil Ecological Processes on Green Roofs: Research and Observation Meet Theory and Intuition” by Christine Thuring.

“Greening the World Inside and Outside” by Mark Paul.

“The Great Green Roof Review” by Jenny Hill and Terry McGlade.

“Pollinators on the Parapets” by Angie Durhman.

“Using a Climate and Ecological Template Approach for Plant Selection for Extensive Green Roofs” by Ed Snodgrass.

“Beyond Extensive and Intensive: Defining the Comprehensive Green Roof” by Molly Meyer.

“Greenwalls in Middle Earth” by Graham Cleary.

“Green Roofs to New Cities” Keynote by Dr. Diana Balmori.

“Biosolar Roofs” by Nathalie Baumann and Dusty Gedge.

“Versatile Living Walls & Roofs: International Applications for Agriculture, Energy Conservation, Pollution Attenuation, and Aesthetics” by Dr. Bob Cameron.

“Greening Rooftops in Alberta: People, Place + Projects” by Kerry Ross.

“Stewardship of Rooftop Ecosystems” by Michael Furbish, Brad Garner, and Dr. Whitney Griffin.

“The Development of Revolutionary Large Scale Vegetated Infrastructure Projects in Latin America and the Foundation of a New Industry” by Pablo Atuesta.

“Two Extremes in Waterwise Design from Denver, Colorado and Athens, Greece” by Andrew Clements and Karla Dakin.

“From Passive House to the Cold North—How Vegetative Envelope Components Impact Buildings Panel Session with Dr. Bob Cameron, Dr. Allen Lee, Dr. Karen Liu, and Chris Wark.”

A Higher Purpose – Benefits to Human Health and Education through Green Roofing by Elizabeth Hart.

“A Green Building Should Look Green, Which Means Hairy! Dr. Ken Yeang Keynote Interview by Linda Velazquez.”

The Greenroofs.com 2014 Top 10 List of Hot Trends in Greenroof & Greenwall Design + a Look into 2015″ by Linda Velazquez and Haven Kiers.

Greenroofs.com’s VS2015 Opening Address from Linda Velazquez.”

Promos:

The Greenroofs & Walls of the World Virtual Summit 2015 Speakers.

Invitation to the Greenroofs & Walls of the World Virtual Summit 2015.

VIRTUAL SUMMIT 2015 teaser from Groncol.

Small Scale Green Roofs at the Virtual Summit by Dusty Gedge and John Little.

London Green and Solar Roof Conference 28th September 2015 (and the French Solar Green Roof Law that Is Not Yet a Law)

July 21, 2015 at 7:00 am

By Dusty Gedge
President, European Federation of Green Roofs and Walls Associations
and Livingroofs.org

The news that the French have passed a law on green roofs and solar roofs has been captivating people around the world.  It was a great pleasure to be part of the Greenroofs & Walls of the World™ Virtual Summit 2015 – my presentation with Nathalie Baumann on Biosolar Roofs generated quite a bit of interest.  Most of the conversations since have been about the so-called French Law.  This makes the forthcoming European Biosolar Roof Conference in London on 28th September even more relevant.

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Small Tortoiseshell Butterfly on a biosolar roof in southern Germany. Photo Credit: Optigrün International AG.

The Solar Green Roof Law that is Not Yet a Law

The French ‘Law’ is still generating a lot of traction on the social networks and even in political circles.  Just last week I had an email regarding a forthcoming White Paper – ‘I am currently researching a White Paper that looks at whether the UK Government could implement legislation akin to the recent French decree that specifies all new commercial builds must have partial green roof or solar array.’  A number of UK politicians have also been in touch.

The irony is that the law in question is, in fact, not a law.  The statement on green and solar roofs sits with the new Loi de la Biodiversité is not yet legally enshrined.  In fact, this weekend I gathered from a recent news piece in French that the French Senate has stripped out many of the progressive elements within the proposed law, including the statement on green and solar roofs.

So the law that isn’t law that got the social networks all abuzz is perhaps no more.  Referring to the French article:

“The National Assembly wanted to see installation of green roofs or including renewable energy devices on retail space under construction. Deleted again by senators who seem to prefer ultra-artificialized cities and at the expense of the quality of life of those who live there. However, they appreciate seeing advertising banners installed instead…”

The National Assembly in France and the French Environment Minister, Ségolène Royal, may try to re-instate the statement but we will have to wait and see whether the law that is not a law actual becomes a legal entity.

Since Nathalie Baumann’s and my video presentation at the 2015 Virtual Conference, I have been inundated with emails from planners across the world wanting to understand the ‘law that isn’t quite a law.’

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This brings into focus the general thrust of our video presentation – the Biosolar Roof Project.  Intelligent planning and design should work towards combining green roof and solar technologies – it should not aim towards an ‘either or’ situation.

This where we come to the detail of the proposed French Law – the original statement inserted into the act stated ‘green roofs AND solar’.  However, this was changed in the first reading in the lower house ‘…to put on a supermarket surface either solar panels or green roofs or the combination of both partially or on the whole surface…’

If this scenario finally becomes legal in France and is followed by other countries, including the UK, it could be to the detriment of a burgeoning green roof market.  Why?  The average developer would turn to solar in preference to green roofs.

The ‘Bio’ element of the Biosolar Roof Project focuses on the provision of biodiversity on green roofs through the use of solar panels.  Solar panels on green roofs can in fact, through good design, provide a more diverse native floral community, which in turn benefits biodiversity, especially pollinators.  This fits neatly into the European Green Infrastructure and Ecosystem Services Strategy that aims to address Europe’s declining biodiversity.

BIOSOLAR ROOFS CONFERENCE 2015 BROCHURE

The conference in London condenses the Biosolar Roof Project’s array of information and stories from across Europe where biosolar roofs are being installed, including in London.  The project ends this year but the London conference in September is a new beginning – one that aims to ensure professionals working in the built environment and contractors in the fields of landscape and renewable energy have the knowledge and awareness to deliver biosolar roofs across Europe.

The conference will be of interest to policy makers, building owners, facility managers, architects, landscape architects, ecologists and sustainability professionals.

One Roof for Energy or One Roof for Ecosystem Services is Not Smart.

The conference and the Biosolar Roof Project will show that we do not have to be reductive when it comes to designing roofs.  We can make a future where roofs deliver the benefits each technology has for society, in one place, on one roof.

The conference will also highlight the need for a biodiversity approach to the specification and design of green roofs to support Europe’s pollinators.  A biosolar future for roofs in Europe can easily be replicated across the globe, to ensure that our cities are resilient, adapted to climate change and support a low carbon economy that embraces biodiversity.

I know that this will have little effect on the ‘law that isn’t quite a law’ in France.  It may, however, influence other countries, especially my own, to take a more inclusive and intelligent approach to sustainable roofs.

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The European Biosolar Roof Conference will be held at the London Living Room at City Hall, London, on 28th September 2015.  Download the Conference Brochure.

Hopefully some of you may attend and I look forward to seeing you in London to help further the cause.

Dusty Gedge
President, European Federation of Green Roofs and Walls Associations
Livingroofs.org

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London, UK. Dusty Gedge is a green roof campaigner and designer, who has actively promoted green roofs in the UK since 1997. He has designed a number of seminal roofs and helped develop the London Green Roof Policy. He is also the current President of the European Federation of Green Roofs and Walls Associations (EFB), and sits on the EU’s working group for the green Infrastructure and ecosystem services policy. His work in Europe over the last few years working on a Pan-European green roof course and he is currently advising on a project on green roofs, pollinators and solar power – Biosolar Roofs.

Dusty is co-author of Small Green Roofs: Low-Tech Options for Greener Living, 2011 and DIY Guide to Green & Living Roofs, among other publications. In 2004 Dusty co-founded Livingroofs.org, a non-profit organisation established to promote, advise upon and seek research into green roofs and similar structures within the context of urban and rural regeneration. With John Little he has written a small-scale green roof guide to help individuals, buildings and landscape contractors to construct small wildlife friendly green roofs. He is also a designer of green roofs and other green infrastructure through his consultancy. Dusty is also a regular speaker at conferences through UK, Europe and the world.

As a birdwatcher first and foremost he has always had a vision that good green infrastructure and green roofs should deliver for biodiversity as well other headline issues connected with cities and climate change adaptation.

Contact Dusty at: dusty@dustygedge.co.uk.

Now Playing at the Virtual Summit 2015: “Small Scale Green Roofs” by Dusty Gedge and John Little

May 8, 2015 at 1:50 pm

In celebration of honoring Earth Day 2015 and our planet’s ecology through healthy, regenerative design, we are highlighting each of the 23 awesome videos from our 30+ spectacular speakers from Greenroofs.com‘s Greenroofs & Walls of the World Virtual Summit 2015 ~ Connecting the Planet with Living Architecture: People, Projects & Design, running through May 31st.

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Our hope is that by familiarizing you more with each presentation and its particular benefits, you will be enticed to join us during our wonderfully easy-to-navigate online Virtual Summit!  And, along with the speakers’ input, I will identify 5 Key Learning Objectives or “takeaway” bullet points that each video presentation provides to participants.

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Today we are spotlighting the collaborative presentation “Small Scale Green Roofs” by Dusty Gedge and John Little.  Everyone knows how much we esteem Dusty – see my recent blog post about his other video at the VS2015: Now Playing at the Virtual Summit 2015: “Biosolar Roofs” by Nathalie Baumann and Dusty Gedge.

Although we had seen John around in a couple of conferences held in the UK, we don’t really know him other than he is a mate of Dusty’s with a quick smile, rather charming, and who is very knowledgeable.

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John’s company has built over 70 timber grass/greenroofs and Dusty has been working in the field since 1997. With over 34 years combined experience of building greenroofs, they discuss the opportunities of greening up small roofs both old and new.

Having written extensively on this both in print and online, their work provides an inspiration for individuals who want to make a contribution themselves and also for small building and landscape contractors who don’t yet have the confidence.

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Filmed in Essex and London, John and Dusty’s video is just awesome – it’s very practical and informative – but extremely entertaining as well.  Both of their personalities really come through in this presentation!

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London, UK.  “Dusty Gedge is a green roof campaigner and designer, who has actively promoted green roofs in the UK since 1997. He has designed a number of seminal roofs and helped develop the London Green Roof Policy. He is also the current President of the European Federation of Green Roof Associations (EFB), and sits on the EU’s working group for the green Infrastructure and ecosystem services policy. His work in Europe over the last few years working on a Pan-European green roof course and he is currently advising on a project on green roofs, pollinators and solar power – Biosolar Roofs.

Dusty is co-author of Small Green Roofs: Low-Tech Options for Greener Living, 2011 and DIY Guide to Green & Living Roofs, among other publications. In 2004 Dusty co-founded Livingroofs.org, a non-profit organisation established to promote, advise upon and seek research into green roofs and similar structures within the context of urban and rural regeneration.” ~ Read his complete bio here from the VS2015.

Essex, UK. “John Little is a landscape contractor and designer. He is well known in the UK for his seminal work on social housing estates, transforming one estate from an amenity grassland desert to wildlife friendly and food growing paradise. He is also well known for his work on small scale green roofs both delivered through his company the Grassroof Company.

John is co-author of Small Green Roofs: Low-Tech Options for Greener Living, 2011 and DIY Guide to Green & Living Roofs, among other publications. With Dusty Gedge he has written a small-scale green roof guide to help individuals, buildings and landscape contractors to construct small wildlife friendly green roofs. Greenroofshelters is another of John’s companies that provides modular small green roofed buildings. The type of buildings that company designs and sells include binshelters, bike sheds and small green roofed freight container buildings.” Read his complete bio here from the VS2015.

VS2015-GedgeandLittleVideo

You will benefit from these 5 Key Learning Objectives as Dusty Gedge and John Little share on the subject:

1) How their varied, self-trained backgrounds led them to a love of birds, plants, ecology, green infrastructure at ground level like rain gardens and low-impact living roofs; hands-on experience and the reevaluation of their greenroofs 5-10 years later to judge their success have informed their practices; now using shipping containers used 10-15 years at sea; work on social housing greenspace;

2) Sharing information led to the minutely detailed small green roofs guide (2005 and then 2014 for the web-based guide), providing advice and confidence for DIYers, and the workshops which allow for the very gratifying interaction with people; 

3) Different aesthetics of natural roofs; whatever you do to the soil will determine the plant community so play around with soils found on site, what nutrient level is best to make it more biodiverse; 

4) Up on John’s greenroof they discuss plants, soils, and more; advice on how to get water off your roof in a reasonable speed; vegetation must be right for each person; edge details; local, regional materials; native herbs;

5) How can we integrate animal biodiversity more for invertebrates, pollinators, and others?  They always put in habitat walls, bird boxes, mammal boxes, etc., for breeding spaces; how this principle from small scale habitat greenroofs can be taken to the large scale.

Watch the 30:55 video presentation “Small Scale Green Roofs” by Dusty Gedge and John Little now playing at the Greenroofs & Walls of the World Virtual Summit 2015.  If you have not yet registered (only $49 or 25), please do:

Registration fee:

$49 – special discounted pricing;

$25 for students/faculty and government professionals

All Video Presentations, Q & A Transcripts, & Exhibitor Booths are On Demand +
Networking Live 24/7 through May 31, 2015

Earn CEUs including 10 GRP CEUs.  Register here.

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Registration Open through May 31st for the Greenroofs.com Virtual Summit 2015

We hope you will support our work!  Please remember that these video presentations will not be made public for at least one year.

Happy watching and participating,

~ Linda V.

Learn more about these awesome video presentations and their 5 Key Learning Objectives at the Greenroofs & Walls of the World Virtual Summit 2015:

“A Green Building Should Look Green, Which Means Hairy!” by Dr. Ken Yeang.

“Biodiversity in the Sky – How Green Roofs Can Be Designed as Wild Life Refuges” by Dr. Stephan Brenneisen.

Green Roofs to New Cities” by Dr. Diana Balmori.

“A Higher Purpose – Benefits to Human Health and Education through Green Roofing” by Elizabeth Hart.

“Beyond Extensive and Intensive: Defining the Comprehensive Green Roof” by Molly Meyer.

“Biosolar Roofs” by Nathalie Baumann and Dusty Gedge.

“From Passive House to the Cold North—How Vegetative Envelope Components Impact Buildings” Panel with Dr. Bob Cameron, Dr. Allen Lee, Dr. Karen Liu, and Chris Wark.

“Greening Rooftops in Alberta: People, Place + Projects” by Kerry Ross.

“Greening the World Inside and Outside” by Mark Paul.

“Greenwalls in Middle Earth” by Graham Cleary.

“Pollinators on the Parapets” by Angie Durhman.